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I have to check, if directory on disk is empty. It means, that it does not contain any folders/files. I know, that there is a simple method. We get array of FileSystemInfo's and check if count of elements equals to zero. Something like that:

    public static bool CheckFolderEmpty(string path)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(path))
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("path");
        }

        var folder = new DirectoryInfo(path);
        if (folder.Exists)
        {
            return folder.GetFileSystemInfos().Length == 0;
        }

        throw new DirectoryNotFoundException();
    }

This approach seems OK. BUT!! It is very, very bad from a perspective of performance. GetFileSystemInfos() is a very hard method. Actually, it enumerates all filesystem objects of folder, gets all their properties, creates objects, fills typed array etc. And all this just to simply check Length. That's stupid, isn't it?

I just profiled such code and determined, that ~250 calls of such method are executed in ~500ms. This is very slow and I believe, that it is possible to do it much quicker.

Any suggestions?

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5  
Out of curiosity, why would you like to check the directory 250 times? –  ya23 Apr 16 '09 at 11:22
    
@ya23 I suppose one would like to check 250 differents directories. Not a single one 250 times. –  Mathieu Pagé Sep 27 '13 at 16:44

14 Answers 14

Some time you might want to verify whether any files exist inside sub directories and ignore those empty sub directories; in this case you can used method below:

public bool isDirectoryContainFiles(string path) {
    if (!Directory.Exists(path)) return false;
    return Directory.EnumerateFiles(path, "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories).Any();
}
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If you don't mind leaving pure C# and going for WinApi calls, then you might want to consider the PathIsDirectoryEmpty() function. According to the MSDN, the function:

Returns TRUE if pszPath is an empty directory. Returns FALSE if pszPath is not a directory, or if it contains at least one file other than "." or "..".

That seems to be a function which does exactly what you want, so it is probably well optimised for that task (although I haven't tested that).

To call it from C#, the pinvoke.net site should help you. (Unfortunately, it doesn't describe this certain function yet, but you should be able to find some functions with similar arguments and return type there and use them as the basis for your call. If you look again into the MSDN, it says that the DLL to import from is shlwapi.dll)

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Great idea. I didn't know about this function. I'll try to compare it's performance with my approach, that i described above. If it would do faster, i'll reuse it in my code. Thanks. –  zhe Jun 18 '09 at 15:44
1  
A note for those who wants go this route. It seems that this PathIsDirectoryEmpty() method from shlwapi.dll works fine on Vista32/64 and XP32/64 machines, but bombs out on some Win7 machines. It must be something to do with versions of shlwapi.dll shipped with different versions of Windows. Beware. –  Alex_P Oct 1 '10 at 10:04
up vote 14 down vote accepted

Here is the extra fast solution, that I finally implemented. Here I am using WinAPI and functions FindFirstFile, FindNextFile. It allows to avoid enumeration of all items in Folder and stops right after detecting the first object in the Folder. This approach is ~6(!!) times faster, than described above. 250 calls in 36ms!

private static readonly IntPtr INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE = new IntPtr(-1);

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
private struct WIN32_FIND_DATA
{
    public uint dwFileAttributes;
    public System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME ftCreationTime;
    public System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME ftLastAccessTime;
    public System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME ftLastWriteTime;
    public uint nFileSizeHigh;
    public uint nFileSizeLow;
    public uint dwReserved0;
    public uint dwReserved1;
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst = 260)]
    public string cFileName;
    [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst = 14)]
    public string cAlternateFileName;
}

[DllImport("kernel32.dll", CharSet=CharSet.Auto)]
private static extern IntPtr FindFirstFile(string lpFileName, out WIN32_FIND_DATA lpFindFileData);

[DllImport("kernel32.dll", CharSet=CharSet.Auto)]
private static extern bool FindNextFile(IntPtr hFindFile, out WIN32_FIND_DATA lpFindFileData);

[DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
private static extern bool FindClose(IntPtr hFindFile);

public static bool CheckDirectoryEmpty_Fast(string path)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(path))
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException(path);
    }

    if (Directory.Exists(path))
    {
        if (path.EndsWith(Path.DirectorySeparatorChar.ToString()))
            path += "*";
        else
            path += Path.DirectorySeparatorChar + "*";

        WIN32_FIND_DATA findData;
        var findHandle = FindFirstFile(path, out findData);

        if (findHandle != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
        {
            try
            {
                bool empty = true;
                do
                {
                    if (findData.cFileName != "." && findData.cFileName != "..")
                        empty = false;
                } while (empty && FindNextFile(findHandle, out findData));

                return empty;
            }
            finally
            {
                FindClose(findHandle);
            }
        }

        throw new Exception("Failed to get directory first file",
            Marshal.GetExceptionForHR(Marshal.GetHRForLastWin32Error()));
    }
    throw new DirectoryNotFoundException();
}

I hope it will be useful for somebody in the future.

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Thank you for sharing your solution. –  Greg Sep 6 '12 at 18:30
    
You need to add SetLastError = true to the DllImport for FindFirstFile in order for the Marshal.GetHRForLastWin32Error() call to work correctly, as described in the Remarks section of the MSDN doc for GetHRForLastWin32Error(). –  Joel V. Earnest-DeYoung Jun 19 '13 at 7:20

Use this. It's simple.

Public Function IsDirectoryEmpty(ByVal strDirectoryPath As String) As Boolean
        Dim s() As String = _
            Directory.GetFiles(strDirectoryPath)
        If s.Length = 0 Then
            Return True
        Else
            Return False
        End If
    End Function
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1  
Simple, perhaps. But incorrect. It has two major bugs: It does not detect if any folders are in the path, only files, and it will throw an exception on a path that does not exist. It's also likely to actually be slower than the OP's original, because I'm fairly sure it gets all the entries and filters them. –  Andrew Barber Sep 6 '12 at 19:59

I'm sure the other answers are faster, and your question asked for whether or not a folder contained files or folders... but I'd think most of the time people would consider a directory empty if it contains no files. ie It's still "empty" to me if it contains empty subdirectories... this may not fit for your usage, but may for others!

  public bool DirectoryIsEmpty(string path)
  {
    int fileCount = Directory.GetFiles(path).Length;
    if (fileCount > 0)
    {
        return false;
    }

    string[] dirs = Directory.GetDirectories(path);
    foreach (string dir in dirs)
    {
      if (! DirectoryIsEmpty(dir))
      {
        return false;
      }
    }

    return true;
  }
share|improve this answer

There is a new feature in Directory and DirectoryInfo in .NET 4 that allows to return a IEnumerable instead of an array, and starts returning results before reading all the directory contents.

See here and there

public bool IsDirectoryEmpty(string path)
{
    IEnumerable<string> items = Directory.EnumerateFileSystemEntries(path);
    using (IEnumerator<string> en = items.GetEnumerator())
    {
        return !en.MoveNext();
    }
}

EDIT: seeing that answer again, I realize this code can be made much simpler...

public bool IsDirectoryEmpty(string path)
{
    return !Directory.EnumerateFileSystemEntries(path).Any();
}
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1  
sweet! love a single line of code solution. upvoted. –  pearcewg Jun 8 '11 at 12:24
    
I like this solution, can it be made to check only for certain filetypes? .Contains("jpg") instead of .any() did not seem to work –  Dennis Apr 30 '13 at 11:56
    
@Dennis, you can specify a wildcard pattern in the call to EnumerateFileSystemEntries, or use .Any(condition) (specify the condition as a lambda expression, or as a method that takes a path as a parameter). –  Thomas Levesque Apr 30 '13 at 12:25
    
+1 for the use of extension method –  Libor Aug 15 '13 at 20:17
1  
Only works since .NET 4 :( –  My-Name-Is Nov 8 '13 at 15:32

You should also wrap your test into a try/catch block in order to make sure you properly handle a DirectoryNotFoundException. This is a classical race condition in case the folder gets deleted right after you having checked whether it existed.

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My code is amazing it just took 00:00:00.0007143 less than milisecond with 34 file in folder

   System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch sw = new System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch();
    sw.Start();

     bool IsEmptyDirectory = (Directory.GetFiles("d:\\pdf").Length == 0);

     sw.Stop();
     Console.WriteLine(sw.Elapsed);
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, if you multiply it by 229 and add GetDirectories(), you will get the same result, as mine :) –  zhe Apr 16 '09 at 11:45

Thanks, everybody, for replies. I tried to use Directory.GetFiles() and Directory.GetDirectories() methods. Good news! The performance improved ~twice! 229 calls in 221ms. But also I hope, that it is possible to avoid enumeration of all items in the folder. Agree, that still the unnecessary job is executing. Don't you think so?

After all investigations, I reached a conclusion, that under pure .NET further optimiation is impossible. I am going to play with WinAPI's FindFirstFile function. Hope it will help.

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Out of interest, what are the reasons you need such high performance for this operation? –  meandmycode Apr 16 '09 at 11:51
    
Rather than answer your own question, mark one of the correct answers as the answer (probably the first one posted or the clearest one). This way future users of stackoverflow will see the best answer right under your question! –  Ray Hayes Apr 16 '09 at 13:38

I'm not aware of a method that will succinctly tell you if a given folder contains any other folders or files, however, using:

Directory.GetFiles(path);
&
Directory.GetDirectories(path);

should help performance since both of these methods will only return an array of strings with the names of the files/directories rather than entire FileSystemInfo objects.

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private static void test()
{
    System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch sw = new System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch();
    sw.Start();

    string [] dirs = System.IO.Directory.GetDirectories("C:\\Test\\");
    string[] files = System.IO.Directory.GetFiles("C:\\Test\\");

    if (dirs.Length == 0 && files.Length == 0)
        Console.WriteLine("Empty");
    else
        Console.WriteLine("Not Empty");

    sw.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine(sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
}

This quick test came back in 2 milliseconds for the folder when empty and when containing subfolders & files (5 folders with 5 files in each)

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You could improve this by returning if 'dirs' is none-empty straight away, without having to get the list of files. –  samjudson Jun 5 '09 at 8:20
1  
Yes, but what if there are thousands of files in it ? –  Thomas Levesque Jun 5 '09 at 8:21
1  
You're also measuring the time to write to the console, which is not negligible. –  user232986 Jul 9 '13 at 19:22

You will have to go the hard drive for this information in any case, and this alone will trump any object creation and array filling.

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1  
True, although creating some of the objects involves looking up extra metadata on disk that might not be necessary. –  Adam Rosenfield Apr 16 '09 at 10:58
    
The ACL would be required for every object for sure. There is no way around it. And once you have to look up those, you might as well read any other information in MFT headers for the files in the folder. –  Don Reba Apr 16 '09 at 11:22

I don't know about the performance statistics on this one, but have you tried using the Directory.GetFiles() static method ?

It returns a string array containing filenames (not FileInfos) and you can check the length of the array in the same way as above.

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same issue, it can be slow if there are many files... but it's probably faster that GetFileSystemInfos –  Thomas Levesque Jun 5 '09 at 8:22

You could try Directory.Exists(path) and Directory.GetFiles(path) - probably less overhead (no objects - just strings etc).

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As always, you are fastest off the trigger! Beat me by a few seconds there! :-) –  Cerebrus Apr 16 '09 at 10:55
    
You were both quicker than me... damn my attention to detail ;-) –  Eoin Campbell Apr 16 '09 at 10:57
2  
Didn't do me any good, though; first answer, and the only one without a vote ;-( –  Marc Gravell Apr 16 '09 at 10:59
    
Unfixed... somebody has an axe to grind, methinks –  Marc Gravell Apr 16 '09 at 11:05

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