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Is there a way to get Number of Lines within a Large Text file ,but without Reading the File content or reading file to end and Counting++.

Maybe there are some File Attributes ,but cannot find it out at all . Because i might be in some cases where i should get Total Number of Line's and compare it to Current line to display the Percentage,and just for a Percentage Display it might be stupid to read first all Content than read it Again to Display the raw text at user.

bests

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If you control the file format, you could inject the number of lines as some meta data either in an external file or in the header of the file. You could also read through, character-by-character and check for newline characters. That would not be terribly fast though. –  Travis Sep 26 '11 at 13:58
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No. You have to read the file. Consider storing it at the beginning of the file or in a separate file when you write the file if you want to find it quickly without counting.

Note that you can stream the file, and it's surprisingly fast:

int count = File.ReadLines(path).Count();

Because i might be in some cases where i should get Total Number of Line's and compare it to Current line to display the Percentage,and just for a Percentage Display it might be stupid to read first all Content than read it Again to Display the raw text at user.

Oh, just get the file size and the length of each line in bytes and keep a cumulative count of the number of bytes processed so far.

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I think that will cause memory trouble ,because i handle with File's < > 8Gb Log File's generated from another Application –  Burimi Sep 26 '11 at 14:00
    
@Cody: The File.ReadLines method doesn't read the entire file at once, so it won't use much memory. It's only available in Framework 4 or later, though. –  Guffa Sep 26 '11 at 14:04
    
@Cody: you might want to try that. File.ReadLines returns an IEnumerable<string> - it does not read the entire file into memory at one time. –  John Saunders Sep 26 '11 at 14:05
    
@Cody: No, as I mentioned, it streams the file. It will not read the whole file into memory. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd383503.aspx –  Jason Sep 26 '11 at 14:06
    
@Jason yeah, the IEnumerable itself wont, but doesnt the .Count() trigger the enumeration to actually execute, therefore reading everything at once? –  UrbanEsc Sep 26 '11 at 14:09
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No, there is no other way.

A file is not line based (or even character based), so there is no meta information about the number of lines (or even number of characters). The only meta data about the content is the length in bytes.

If you have some additional information about the file, for example that each line is exactly the same length, and it uses an 8-bit encoding so that the number of characters is the same as the number of bytes, you could calculate the number of lines from the file size.

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+1 ...and have a defined line ending sequence, e.g., \r\n vs. \n –  RedFilter Sep 26 '11 at 14:01
    
@Guffa could you tell FileZilla that :P - no just Joking ,im handling with FileZilla Log File's and they're terribly large so i think i will not display the Percentage . –  Burimi Sep 26 '11 at 14:01
    
@Cody: You could use an estimated average line length to get an approximate precentage, or calculate the percentage based on file position instead of line. –  Guffa Sep 26 '11 at 14:04
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As Guffa and Jason said, there is no way to get the lines other than reading to the end.

To solve your problem differently:

If you are interested only in the percentage display you COULD try to acummulate that value from the total file size and the line you are currently at. You need to apply some voodoo tricks there to get the actual bytes read (like say, you have read to line 10, and a total of 200 bytes or whatever) and the file size is 400bytes. You could probably guess that you are at 50%, without giving needing to know a total line number.

Thats just some random numbers there, btw.

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+1 for explanation and a possible ingestion –  Burimi Sep 26 '11 at 14:02
    
If you only need percentage and not the total line number i think its totally doable –  UrbanEsc Sep 26 '11 at 14:07
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