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What naming convention do you use for member variables?

Is there a coding-style convention regarding the name of a field vs. the name of that field's setter method's argument?

Example:

class MapLine{

    private double elevation;

    [...]

    public void setElevation(double myElevation) {
            elevation = myElevation;
    // more code
    }

    [...]

My field is called elevation, a clear, sensible name. I want the argument of setElevation to have a sensible name, too; intuitively, I want that to be elevation, not least because that's what's going to be written in the documentation, so it has to be clear. But it can't be the same as the name of the field (elevation=elevation?!) so to disambiguate, I'm stuck giving it an ugly or confusing name, e.g. myElevation.

What's the usual convention? Give the field an ugly name instead of the argument? Or some other conventional way of disambiguiating the variable names? mapLineElevation?

This may seem like pedantry to some, but I like nice, clean code!

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marked as duplicate by Joachim Sauer, Johan Sjöberg, Jean-François Corbett, Sean Patrick Floyd, Andy Thomas-Cramer Sep 26 '11 at 19:30

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
+1 for nice, clean code :) –  Philipp Reichart Sep 26 '11 at 14:21
    
@Joachim Sauer: Right! It didn't occur to me to search for "member" instead of field. Voting to close my own question. –  Jean-François Corbett Sep 26 '11 at 14:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Call it elevation and set with: this.elevation = elevation. Can't get more clear then this I think... the this keywords leaves no doubt which elevation you actually mean. not to the compiler, and not to fellow coders.

public void setElevation(double elevation ) {
            this.elevation = elevation ;
    // more code
}
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+1. Always use it this way. –  Artic Sep 26 '11 at 14:23
    
Except for the "more code" part, -- don't violate the principle of least surprise in something that's named like a simple setter. –  Philipp Reichart Sep 26 '11 at 14:26
1  
@PhilippReichart: The OP code explicitly mentions this 'more code'. though I agree a setter doesn't need to do anything other then a simple set, the question is not about it, and I deliberately avoided changing the code the OP provided, where it was not necessery for the answer. –  amit Sep 26 '11 at 14:30
    
@amit Agreed, JBNizet also left a nice comment unter Gabriel's answer when "more code" is acceptable. –  Philipp Reichart Sep 26 '11 at 14:33
    
"more code" is the entire point of having setters (and getters)! –  Jean-François Corbett Sep 26 '11 at 14:36

Explicitly scope the left hand side to your instance field using this:

public void setElevation(double elevation) {
    this.elevation = elevation;
}
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public void setElevation(double elevation) {
        this.elevation = elevation;
// more code
}
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1  
I wouldn't recommend more code in something that is named like a simple setter (principle of least surprise) –  Philipp Reichart Sep 26 '11 at 14:23
4  
If it's a real Java Bean, the setter might have to fire a property change event. If not, changing some other field values (for example, the length of the line) might also be needed. The invariants of the classes should always be verified after the method call. And that's precisely why using setter over accessing fields directly is encouraged: it allows encapsulating behavior when the property changes. –  JB Nizet Sep 26 '11 at 14:27
1  
@Philipp Reichart: Possibly true, but here I copied the OP's code snippet and only modified the parameter name. –  Gabriel Negut Sep 26 '11 at 14:27
1  
@JBNizet True, validation and change notifications is acceptable "more code" :) –  Philipp Reichart Sep 26 '11 at 14:31

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