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Is there a (simple) way to get the "sign" of a number (integer) in PHP comparable to gmp_signDocs:

  • -1 negative
  • 0 zero
  • 1 positive

I remember there is some sort of compare function that can do this but I'm not able to find it at the moment.

I quickly compiled this (Demo) which does the job, but maybe there is something more nifty (like a single function call?), I would like to map the result onto an array:

$numbers = array(-100, 0, 100);

foreach($numbers as $number)
{
   echo $number, ': ', $number ? abs($number) / $number : 0, "\n";
}

(this code might run into floating point precision problems probably)

Related: Request #19621 Math needs a "sign()" function

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Why not install gmp? –  Orbling Sep 26 '11 at 14:34
    
@Tomalak Geret'kal: Sometimes you're looking for feedback, right? ;) –  hakre Sep 26 '11 at 14:41
    
@hakre: Try codereview.SE :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 26 '11 at 14:43
1  
@Orbling: Good question, maybe because it's already installed? Let me try :) –  hakre Sep 26 '11 at 14:43
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6 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

A variant to the above in my question I tested and which works as well and has not the floating point problem:

min(1, max(-1, $number))

Edit: The code above has a flaw for float numbers (question was about integer numbers) in the range greater than -1 and smaller than 1 which can be fixed with the following shorty:

min(1, max(-1, $number == 0 ? 0 : $number * INF))

That one still has a flaw for the float NAN making it return -1 always. That might not be correct. Instead one might want to return 0 as well:

min(1, max(-1, (is_nan($number) or $number == 0) ? 0 : $number * INF))
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2  
this is ok for integers, but if somebody pastes this solution for floats he will get into trouble. –  rocksportrocker Sep 26 '11 at 19:03
    
@rocksportrocker: Especially for NAN and INF values. And for integers there is overflow as well. –  hakre Sep 26 '11 at 20:36
    
don't works for 0.3 (or all numbers from -1 to 1) –  Yukulélé Apr 4 '13 at 15:10
    
@hakre: in this case, all number from -1 to 1 return 0, not their sign –  Yukulélé Apr 4 '13 at 15:21
    
@Yukulélé: Edited the post. Hope this is more helpful. Keep in mind that the question asks for integer numbers, not floating point numbers. –  hakre Apr 4 '13 at 15:46
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You can nest ternary operators:

echo $number, ': ',  ($number >= 0 ? ($number == 0 ? 0 : 1) : -1 )

This has no problem with floating point precision and avoids an floating point division.

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1  
yeah, but the manual says you should avoid stacking them. –  Gordon Sep 26 '11 at 15:29
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What's wrong with this form?

if ( $num < 0 )
{
  //negative
}
else if ( $num == 0 )
{
  //zero
}
else
{
  //positive
}

or ternary:

$sign = $num < 0 ? -1 : ( $num > 0 ? 1 : 0 );

Not sure of the performance of abs vs value comparison, but you could use:

$sign = $num ? $num / abs($num) : 0;

and you could turn any of them into a function:

function valueSign($num)
{
  return $sign = $num < 0 ? -1 : ( $num > 0 ? 1 : 0 );
  //or
  return $sign = $num ? $num / abs($num) : 0;
}

I suppose you could be talking about gmp_cmp, which you could call as gmp_cmp( $num, 0 );

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The expression should represent a value of: (-1, 0, 1). –  hakre Sep 26 '11 at 14:30
    
@hakre, i'm not sure what you mean by that. –  zzzzBov Sep 26 '11 at 14:38
    
@hakre, forgot about that part, added a zero check. –  zzzzBov Sep 26 '11 at 14:40
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Use strcmpDocs:

echo $number, ': ', strcmp($number, 0), "\n";
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Does this work for numbers (as strings)? I think that's the function I was thinking about, but I'm unsure if it's really doing the job. –  hakre Sep 26 '11 at 14:31
    
Yes it does. Have a try with it. –  M42 Sep 26 '11 at 14:33
    
Cool! The docs is a little unprecise if it's always -1, 0 or 1, however, I will try it in the code. Thanks! –  hakre Sep 26 '11 at 14:40
    
this is elegant, but not very efficient. Converting an int to a string needs much longer than comparisons to 0. –  rocksportrocker Sep 26 '11 at 19:04
1  
I now have tested this for some hours. If the $number actually is a string (and representing zero, like "n/a"), this won't work (min(max) works here). Just noting, it's a side-case, just leaving this for the note. It generally worked pretty well, but not for string variables representing the numerical value 0 as we know it in PHP. @rocksportrocker: There are not really actual types like string or intever in PHP, so the conversion argument seems bogus in my eyes. Would be micro-optimizing for nothing anyway to that closely watch at it. –  hakre Sep 27 '11 at 10:00
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Here's one without loop:

function sign($number){
    echo $number, ': ', $number ? abs($number) / $number : 0, "\n";
}

$numbers = array(-100, 0, 100);

array_walk($numbers, 'sign');
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Here's a cool one-liner that will do it for you efficiently and reliably:

function sign($n) {
    return ($n > 0) - ($n < 0);
}
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