Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My question refers to the usage of Alarm Manager with partial wake lock.

does canceling a repeating task and resetting it cost more cpu/memory/battery than the task assigned to the alarm manager? the task is to send a message to the server if no other messages have been sent in the last 30 seconds.

so, in case my app just sends a message, is it better to reset the Alarm Manager, or leave it as it is?

Question 2:

using the alarm manager alow me to send the message even when the device asleep.

my app designed to try to reconnect to the server in case of disconnection and if not succeeded after 3 tries to shutdown.

how can I make this work when device is asleep ?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

does canceling a repeating task and resetting it cost more cpu/memory/battery than just running an if statement?

What "if statement"?

To clarify, my repeated task is to send a message to my server if no message has been sent in the last 30 seconds.

That does not seem like a prudent use of the user's battery. Please allow them to configure the period, including an option to not send such messages. Or, better yet, let the server do its own tracking, and eliminate "send a message for no messages" messages completely.

so in case my service sends a message to the server, is it better to reset the Alarm Manager, or leave it as it is?

Since your code is already running (it just sent a message to the server), cancelling and rescheduling an alarm should be inexpensive.

share|improve this answer
    
I have to send a message to the server, thats what keeps the connection alive. I edit my question, and added another one which is related in a way. –  piojo Sep 27 '11 at 8:52
    
@piojo: "I have to send a message to the server, thats what keeps the connection alive" -- keeping a "connection alive" to a server all of the time is bad for the battery. In fact, given your edited description, your app seems fairly scary, since it appears that you intend to keep your application running 24x7 with a WakeLock, which will give the user only a couple of hours of battery life. I think you need to seriously reconsider re-architecting this application to take reality into account. –  CommonsWare Sep 27 '11 at 11:17
    
As for now, it took 1% for a hour, when device sleeps –  piojo Oct 2 '11 at 9:19
    
I did the test again this time for 14 hours. it took 7% of the battery. not bad –  piojo Oct 6 '11 at 8:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.