Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've read around about const and static readonly fields. We have some classes which contains only constant values. Used for various things around in our system. So I am wondering if my observation is correct:

Should these kind of constant values always be static readonly for everything that is public? And only use const for internal/protected/private values?

What do you recommend? Should I maybe even not use static readonly fields, but rather use properties maybe?

share|improve this question
35  
+1 i was just going to ask this one –  TheVillageIdiot Aug 27 '09 at 7:49
4  
We were arguing about this at work and I thought, "Someone must've asked this on SO!", great question and clear concise answer. –  HipsterZipster Jun 16 '11 at 18:43
1  
Here's a very interesting single case I just found in favor of static readonly: try using a const inside an IEnumerator which would trigger an unrecheable yield and you'll get a dreaded "Internal compiler error". I didn't test the code outside Unity3D, but I trust this is either a mono or .NET bug. It is a c# issue nevertheless. –  Cawas Jul 4 '13 at 20:13
    
possible duplicate of What is the difference between const and readonly? –  nawfal Oct 22 '13 at 7:04

10 Answers 10

up vote 403 down vote accepted

Public static readonly fields are a little unusual; public static properties (with only a get) would be more common (perhaps backed by a private static readonly field).

Const values are burned directly into the call-site; this is double edged:

  • it is useless if the value is fetched at runtime, perhaps from config
  • if you change the value of a const, you need to rebuild all the clients
  • but it can be faster, as it avoids a method call...
  • ...which might sometimes have been inlined by the JIT anyway

If the value will never change, then const is fine - Zero etc make reasonable consts ;-p Other than that, static properties are more common.

share|improve this answer
64  
Thanks Marc. Like alot of coders, I think I've just been randomly using which ever depending on my mood. –  Dead account Apr 16 '09 at 11:32
4  
Why a property over a field? If it's an immutable class, I see no difference. –  Michael Hedgpeth Apr 16 '09 at 11:32
25  
@Michael - same reasons as always; it hides the implementation. You may find (later) that you need to be lazy loaded, configuration based, a facade, or whatever. In reality, either would often be fine... –  Marc Gravell Apr 16 '09 at 11:34
15  
@CoffeeAddict by definition, a constant is not pulling values from a config file; it is burned in as a literal at compile-time. The only way you can use a constant at runtime is via reflection over the fields. Any other time you try to use it, the compiler as already substituted your constant usage for literal usage; i.e. if a method in your code uses 6 constants, and you inspect it as IL, there will be no mention of any constant lookups; the literal values will simply be loaded in-situ –  Marc Gravell Nov 28 '11 at 6:25
2  
@Mark: For constants, I don't see that using properties like this "public static int NumberOfWheels { get { return 4;}}" is actually more COMMON than using a public field like "static readonly int NumberOfWheels = 4;" Could you elaborate on your idea or possibly show a sample example of what you would see more often for this case? –  Philibert Perusse Jul 19 '12 at 16:10

I would use static readonly if the Consumer is in a different assembly. Having the const and the consumer in two differen assemblies is a nice way to shoot yourself in the foot.

share|improve this answer
3  
So I think as some have mentioned or alluded to, it may be wise to only use const for values that are actually well known constants if they are made public otherwise they should be reserved for internal, protected, or private access scope. –  jpierson Mar 9 '11 at 18:38
1  
Greate article, really helpful, thanks. This answer should get more love, just for the article itself. –  Daan Timmer Oct 3 '13 at 22:27
    
@Michael Stum : Very interesting finding - after 5 years, in 2014 with .NET 4.5, this issue is still existing. I put it into my github repo for future reference. –  Dio Phung Feb 26 at 9:11
    
@Dio The reason it's still existing is because it is not an issue per se - it's something to be aware of, but the ability to inline consts across assembly boundaries is a good thing for performance. It's really just a matter of really understanding that "constant" means "it will never change". –  Michael Stum Feb 27 at 3:02
    
@MichaelStum Ok I should not call it "an issue". In my line of work, I do have const and share it across assemblies but I recompile for each deployment or code shipment. Nevertheless, this fact definitely worth to take note of it. –  Dio Phung Feb 27 at 7:41

Some other things

const int a

  • must be initialized
  • initialization must be at compile time

readonly int a

  • can use default value, without initializing
  • initialization can be at run time
share|improve this answer

One thing to note is const is restricted to primitive/value types (the exception being strings)

share|improve this answer
8  
Actually const could be used for other types too, except that it has to be initialized to null, which makes it useless :) –  nawfal Oct 22 '13 at 6:58
1  
exception as in System.Exception? :) –  Memet Olsen Jan 6 at 14:32

This is just a supplement to the other answers. I will not repeat them (now four years later).

There are situations where a const and a non-const have different semantics. For example:

const int y = 42;

static void Main()
{
  short x = 42;
  Console.WriteLine(x.Equals(y));
}

prints out True, whereas:

static readonly int y = 42;

static void Main()
{
  short x = 42;
  Console.WriteLine(x.Equals(y));
}

writes False.

The reason is that the method x.Equals has two overloads, one that takes in a short (System.Int16) and one that takes an object (System.Object). Now the question is whether one or both apply with my y argument.

When y is a compile-time constant (literal), the const case, it becomes important that there does exist an implicit conversion from int to short provided that the int is a constant, and provided that the C# compiler verifies that its value is within the range of a short (which 42 is). See Implicit constant expression conversions in the C# Language Specification. So both overloads have to be considered. The overload Equals(short) is preferred (any short is an object, but not all object are short). So y is converted to short, and that overload is used. Then Equals compares two short of identical value, and that gives true.

When y is not a constant, no implicit conversion from int to short exists. That's because in general an int may be too huge to fit into a short. (An explicit conversion does exist, but I didn't say Equals((short)y), so that's not relevant.) We see that only one overload applies, the Equals(object) one. So y is boxed to object. Then Equals is going to compare a System.Int16 to a System.Int32, and since the run-time types do not even agree, that will yield false.

We conclude that in some (rare) cases, changing a const type member to a static readonly field (or the other way, when that is possible) can change the behavior of the program.

share|improve this answer
3  
A good addition to the accepted answer. I would like to add that proper conversion of data types and other similar guidelines (like try catches etc) should be a staple of experienced programmers and not left to the compiler. Nevertheless, I learnt something new from here. Thank you. –  Uknight Oct 17 '13 at 10:35
    
That's one gotcha! –  nawfal Oct 22 '13 at 6:59

The readonly keyword is different from the const keyword. A const field can only be initialized at the declaration of the field. A readonly field can be initialized either at the declaration or in a constructor. Therefore, readonly fields can have different values depending on the constructor used. Also, while a const field is a compile-time constant, the readonly field can be used for runtime constants

Short and clear MSDN reference here

share|improve this answer

My preference is to use const whenever I can, which as mentioned above is limited to literal expressions or something that does not require evaluation.

If I hot up against that limitation, then I fallback to static readonly, with one caveat. I would generally use a public static property with a getter and a backing private static readonly field as Marc mentions here.

share|improve this answer

Const and readonly are similar, but they are not exactly the same. A const field is a compile-time constant, meaning that that value can be computed at compile-time. A readonly field enables additional scenarios in which some code must be run during construction of the type. After construction, a readonly field cannot be changed.

For instance, const members can be used to define members like:

struct Test
{
    public const double Pi = 3.14;
    public const int Zero = 0;
}

since values like 3.14 and 0 are compile-time constants. However, consider the case where you define a type and want to provide some pre-fab instances of it. E.g., you might want to define a Color class and provide "constants" for common colors like Black, White, etc. It isn't possible to do this with const members, as the right hand sides are not compile-time constants. One could do this with regular static members:

public class Color
{
    public static Color Black = new Color(0, 0, 0);
    public static Color White = new Color(255, 255, 255);
    public static Color Red = new Color(255, 0, 0);
    public static Color Green = new Color(0, 255, 0);
    public static Color Blue = new Color(0, 0, 255);
    private byte red, green, blue;

    public Color(byte r, byte g, byte b) {
        red = r;
        green = g;
        blue = b;
    }
}

but then there is nothing to keep a client of Color from mucking with it, perhaps by swapping the Black and White values. Needless to say, this would cause consternation for other clients of the Color class. The "readonly" feature addresses this scenario. By simply introducing the readonly keyword in the declarations, we preserve the flexible initialization while preventing client code from mucking around.

public class Color
{
    public static readonly Color Black = new Color(0, 0, 0);
    public static readonly Color White = new Color(255, 255, 255);
    public static readonly Color Red = new Color(255, 0, 0);
    public static readonly Color Green = new Color(0, 255, 0);
    public static readonly Color Blue = new Color(0, 0, 255);
    private byte red, green, blue;

    public Color(byte r, byte g, byte b) {
        red = r;
        green = g;
        blue = b;
    }
}

It is interesting to note that const members are always static, whereas a readonly member can be either static or not, just like a regular field.

It is possible to use a single keyword for these two purposes, but this leads to either versioning problems or performance problems. Assume for a moment that we used a single keyword for this (const) and a developer wrote:

public class A
{
    public static const C = 0;
}

and a different developer wrote code that relied on A:

public class B
{
    static void Main() {
        Console.WriteLine(A.C);
    }
}

Now, can the code that is generated rely on the fact that A.C is a compile-time constant? I.e., can the use of A.C simply be replaced by the value 0? If you say "yes" to this, then that means that the developer of A cannot change the way that A.C is initialized -- this ties the hands of the developer of A without permission. If you say "no" to this question then an important optimization is missed. Perhaps the author of A is positive that A.C will always be zero. The use of both const and readonly allows the developer of A to specify the intent. This makes for better versioning behavior and also better performance.

share|improve this answer

const:

  1. value should be given upon declaration
  2. compile time constant

readonly:

  1. value can be given upon declaration or during runtime using constructors.The value may vary depend upon the constructor used.
  2. run time constant
share|improve this answer

Const: Const is nothing but "constant", a variable of which the value is constant but at compile time. And it's mandatory to assign a value to it. By default a const is static and we cannot change the value of a const variable throughout the entire program.

Static ReadOnly: A Static Readonly type variable's value can be assigned at runtime or assigned at compile time and changed at runtime. But this variable's value can only be changed in the static constructor. And cannot be changed further. It can change only once at runtime

Reference from c-sharpcorner

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.