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I have a protected method in my application contoller

def current_user
  @current_user ||= User.find_by_id(session[:user_id])
end

I was wondering what ||= means? I've been trying to search and find out, but to no avail.

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marked as duplicate by Andrew Marshall, Code Lღver, Yan Sklyarenko, Avanz, Guntis Treulands May 14 at 8:07

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Not sure if the name applies, but in C# is called the null-coalescing operator msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173224.aspx –  kenny Sep 26 '11 at 14:53
    
Thank you everyone for helping me out and putting me in the right direction! –  pka Sep 26 '11 at 15:07
3  
    
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6 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Basically, a ||= b means assign b to a if a is null or undefined or false (i.e. false-ish value in ruby), it is a shortcut to a = b unless a.

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Also check out Conditional assignment on Ruby Programming/Syntax/Operators. –  rdvdijk Sep 26 '11 at 15:12
1  
Important to realise it is short circuiting as well - b will not be run if a is false-ish (saving time by not doing an expensive db query, for example). –  Callum Rogers Sep 26 '11 at 17:41
1  
it's not a = b unless a. Please see rubyinside.com/… for better understanding how it actually works. –  Sigurd Oct 28 '13 at 14:03
    
It's not the same as a = b unless a. a ||= b always returns a (after the assignment if applicable), whereas a = b unless a returns nil if a is trueish. This is a very significant distinction, as this mechanism is often used to cache a heavy operation. –  Pelle ten Cate May 23 at 23:18
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||= is a ruby idiom. It means if @current_user is nil (or false) then try to find it by id and assign it to @current_user, otherwise do nothing.

See these related questions.

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This is part of Ruby.

If @current_user is nil or false, it will be set to User.find_by_id(session[:user_id])

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Notice the parallels with a += b, which is equivalent to a = a + b.

So a ||= b is equivalent to a = a || b. As others have mentioned, this is the same as a = b unless a.

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Actually, Ruby should not assign in case a is not false-ish, so that a = a || b isn't strictly equivalent to a = b unless a. One might think specifically of implications in case a happens to be a Hash for instance. –  Romain Sep 26 '11 at 15:07
    
No, it isn't, as has been discussed several times already here on SO, dozens of times on the Ruby mailinglists and literally hundreds of times in a myriad of blog posts. –  Jörg W Mittag Sep 27 '11 at 11:16
    
Oh, right. Can you give me an an example of when this is not the case? –  grifaton Sep 27 '11 at 12:24
    
It's not the same as a = b unless a. a ||= b always returns a (after the assignment if applicable), whereas a = b unless a returns nil if a is trueish. This is a very significant distinction, as this mechanism is often used to cache a heavy operation. –  Pelle ten Cate May 23 at 23:17
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In ruby 'a ||= b' is called "or - equal" operator. It is a short way of saying if a has a boolean value of true(if it is neither false or nil) it has the value of a. If not it has the value of b.

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Basically, a ||= b means assign b to a if a is null or undefined or false (i.e. false-ish value in ruby), it is a shortcut to a = b unless a.

share|edit answered Sep 26 '11 at 14:48

Romain 6,9711330

In addition to this answer here`s an example -

arr = nil || []
arr0 ||= []

arr <=> arr0    *#=> 0*

This means arr expression and arr0 expression are equal.

Hope this helps to understand better ||= operator.

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