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I am trying to prevent dialogs built with Alert builder from being dismissed when the Activity is restarted.

If I overload the onConfigurationChanged method I can successfully do this and reset the layout to correct orientation but I lose sticky text feature of edittext. So in solving the dialog problem I have created this edittext problem.

If I save the strings from the edittext and reassign them in the onCofiguration change they still seem to default to initial value not what was entered before rotation. Even if I force an invalidate does seem to update them.

I really need to solve either the dialog problem or the edittext problem.

Thanks for the help.

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How do you save/restore the contents of the edited EditText? Can you show some code? –  Peter Knego Sep 26 '11 at 15:46
    
I figured out the problem with that, I was forgetting to get the view again by Id after resetting the layout. –  draksia Sep 26 '11 at 17:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 40 down vote accepted

The best way to avoid this problem nowadays is by using a DialogFragment.

Create a new class which extends DialogFragment. Override onCreateDialog and return your old Dialog or an AlertDialog.

Then you can show it with DialogFragment.show(fragmentManager, tag).

Here's an example with a Listener:

public class MyDialogFragment extends DialogFragment {

    public interface YesNoListener {
        void onYes();

        void onNo();
    }

    @Override
    public void onAttach(Activity activity) {
        super.onAttach(activity);
        if (!(activity instanceof YesNoListener)) {
            throw new ClassCastException(activity.toString() + " must implement YesNoListener");
        }
    }

    @Override
    public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        return new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity())
                .setTitle(R.string.dialog_my_title)
                .setMessage(R.string.dialog_my_message)
                .setPositiveButton(android.R.string.yes, new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

                    @Override
                    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                        ((YesNoListener) getActivity()).onYes();
                    }
                })
                .setNegativeButton(android.R.string.no, new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {

                    @Override
                    public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                        ((YesNoListener) getActivity()).onNo();
                    }
                })
                .create();
    }
}

And in the Activity you call:

new MyDialogFragment().show(getSupportFragmentManager(), "tag"); // or getFragmentManager() in API 11+

This answer mixes these three questions (and their answers):

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If you're changing the layout on orientation change I wouldn't put android:configChanges="orientation" in your manifest because you're recreating the views anyway.

Save the current state of your activity (like text entered, shown dialog, data displayed etc.) using these methods:

@Override
protected void onSaveInstanceState(Bundle outState) {
    super.onSaveInstanceState(outState);
}

@Override
protected void onRestoreInstanceState(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onRestoreInstanceState(savedInstanceState);
}

That way the activity goes through onCreate again and afterwards calls the onRestoreInstanceState method where you can set your EditText value again.

If you want to store more complex Objects you can use

@Override
public Object onRetainNonConfigurationInstance() {
}

Here you can store any object and in onCreate you just have to call getLastNonConfigurationInstance(); to get the Object.

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2  
OnRetainNonConfigurationInstance() is now deprecated as the Doc says : developer.android.com/reference/android/app/… setRetainInstance(boolean retain) should be use instead : developer.android.com/reference/android/app/… –  ForceMagic Feb 20 '14 at 18:40
1  
-1 just use a DialogFragment instead –  Alex Lockwood May 24 '14 at 18:52

A very easy approach is to create the dialogs from the method onCreateDialog() (see note below). You show them through showDialog(). This way, Android handles the rotation for you and you do not have to call dismiss() in onPause() to avoid a WindowLeak and then you neither have to restore the dialog. From the docs:

Show a dialog managed by this activity. A call to onCreateDialog(int, Bundle) will be made with the same id the first time this is called for a given id. From thereafter, the dialog will be automatically saved and restored.

See Android docs showDialog() for more info. Hope it helps somebody!

Note: If using AlertDialog.Builder, do not call show() from onCreateDialog(), call create() instead. If using ProgressDialog, just create the object, set the parameters you need and return it. In conclusion, show() inside onCreateDialog() causes problems, just create de Dialog instance and return it. This should work! (I have experienced issues using showDialog() from onCreate() -actually not showing the dialog-, but if you use it in onResume() or in a listener callback it works well).

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Do you have a code example? –  NeTeInStEiN Feb 22 '12 at 16:21
    
For which case would you need some code? The onCreateDialog() or showing it with the builder and calling show() to it? –  Caumons Feb 23 '12 at 10:19
    
I have managed to do it.. but the thing is, onCreateDialog() is now deprecated :-\ –  NeTeInStEiN Feb 23 '12 at 10:42
    
OK! Have in mind that most of Android devices still work with 2.X versions, so you can use it anyway! Have a look at Android platform versions usage –  Caumons Feb 23 '12 at 11:28
1  
You can use the builder classes e.g. AlertDialog.Builder. If you use it inside onCreateDialog(), instead of using show() return the result of create(). Else, call show() and store the returned AlertDialog into an attribute of the Activity and in onPause() dismiss() it if showing in order to avoid a WindowLeak. Hope it helps! –  Caumons Feb 23 '12 at 14:36

// Prevent dialog dismiss when orientation changes private static void doKeepDialog(Dialog dialog){ WindowManager.LayoutParams lp = new WindowManager.LayoutParams(); lp.copyFrom(dialog.getWindow().getAttributes()); lp.width = WindowManager.LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT; lp.height = WindowManager.LayoutParams.WRAP_CONTENT; dialog.getWindow().setAttributes(lp); }

public static void doLogout(final Context context){     
        final AlertDialog dialog = new AlertDialog.Builder(context)
        .setIcon(android.R.drawable.ic_dialog_alert)
        .setTitle(R.string.titlelogout)
        .setMessage(R.string.logoutconfirm)
        .setPositiveButton("Yes", new DialogInterface.OnClickListener()
        {
            @Override
            public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {
                ...   
            }

        })
        .setNegativeButton("No", null)      
        .show();    

        doKeepDialog(dialog);
    }
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To whom find my code not useful, try it before click :-) –  Chung IW Dec 6 '14 at 2:17

You can combine the Dialog's onSave/onRestore methods with the Activity's onSave/onRestore methods to keep the state of the Dialog.

Note: This method works for those "simple" Dialogs, such as displaying an alert message. It won't reproduce the contents of a WebView embedded in a Dialog. If you really want to prevent a complex dialog from dismissal during rotation, try Chung IW's method.

            @Override
            protected void onRestoreInstanceState(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
                 super.onRestoreInstanceState(savedInstanceState);
                 myDialog.onRestoreInstanceState(savedInstanceState.getBundle("DIALOG"));
                 // Put your codes to retrieve the EditText contents and 
                 // assign them to the EditText here.
            }

            @Override
            protected void onSaveInstanceState(Bundle outState) {
                 super.onSaveInstanceState(outState);
                 // Put your codes to save the EditText contents and put them 
                 // to the outState Bundle here.
                 outState.putBundle("DIALOG", myDialog.onSaveInstanceState());
            }
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