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Why was this deprecated in C++? How is the this pointer in C++ different than this in Java?

Or is Wikipedia just wrong

Early versions of C++ would let the this pointer be changed; by doing so a programmer could change which object a method was working on. This feature was eventually deprecated, and now this in C++ is const .

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You might need to check the WP history. I've removed the term "deprecated", as well as the statement that the pointer is const. –  MSalters Sep 27 '11 at 8:37
    
Interesting... The wording you quoted from Wikipedia is incorrect. this is not const. this is an rvalue. And when I enter the edit mode in Wikipedia I already see "[[rvalue]]" there (someone edited it apparently), but the main page still says "const". –  AndreyT Sep 27 '11 at 15:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I believe your mistake is in how you interpret that line. They're not saying "The this feature was deprecated". Merely the ability to reassign the this pointer was deprecated.

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But why? Looking for a technical answer –  Elpezmuerto Sep 26 '11 at 15:32
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@Elpezmuerto: Because it makes no sense to re-assign the this pointer, which would lead to incredibly error-prone code. this should lead to the "current object instance" within a member function, and never anything else. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 26 '11 at 15:33

Based on your edit, the Wikipedia article is poorly worded. this is not deprecated, just that the feature to allow this pointer to be changed has been deprecated. The keyword this still exists.

From Stroustrup himself:

Why is "this" not a reference?

Because "this" was introduced into C++ (really into C with Classes) before references were added. Also, I chose "this" to follow Simula usage, rather than the (later) Smalltalk use of "self".

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I don't think it's wrong per se, but it is poorly worded. –  Flexo Sep 26 '11 at 15:32
    
@awoodland: edited.. thanks –  user195488 Sep 26 '11 at 15:32
    
It's phrased just fine. The OP simply misinterpreted it. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 26 '11 at 15:33
    
This is the only answer that explains what the OP misunderstood. +1. –  ereOn Sep 26 '11 at 15:33
    
@ereOn: In what way does mine not? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 26 '11 at 15:34

You misinterpreted the quote.

Early versions of C++ would let the this pointer be changed; by doing so a programmer could change which object a method was working on. This feature was eventually deprecated, and now this in C++ is const.

What's deprecated is this — the pointer, not the object it points to — being mutable.

this itself is still very much alive, with the type prvalue T*. (GCC simulates this for the time being, by making this a rvalue T* const in current GCC 4.7.0.)

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well, the article is phrased badly too –  user195488 Sep 26 '11 at 15:31
    
Isn't this const only in const member functions? –  Cat Plus Plus Sep 26 '11 at 15:31
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@CatPlusPlus: No. The pointer is const, always. Remember T* const is not the same as T const*. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 26 '11 at 15:32
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What I meant: "In the body of a non-static (9.3) member function, the keyword this is a prvalue expression whose value is the address of the object for which the function is called. The type of this in a member function of a class X is X*. If the member function is declared const, the type of this is const X*, if the member function is declared volatile, the type of this is volatile X*, and if the member function is declared const volatile, the type of this is const volatile X*." –  Cat Plus Plus Sep 26 '11 at 15:36
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I agree with @CatPlusPlus. this is a prvalue. It has a pointer type, i.e. non-class type, so it can't be cv-qualified. The type of this in a non-const member function of T is T*, not T* const. The fact that you can't change it is because it is a prvalue, not because it is const which it isn't. –  Charles Bailey Sep 26 '11 at 15:42

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