Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I seem to get different outputs:

from StringIO import *

file = open('1.bmp', 'r')

print file.read(), '\n'
print StringIO(file.read()).getvalue()

Why? Is it because StringIO only supports text strings or something?

share|improve this question
2  
with that code, the second file.read() would get nothing. You should use seek(0) before reading the file again. – Facundo Casco Sep 26 '11 at 16:32
up vote 8 down vote accepted

When you call file.read(), it will read the entire file into memory. Then, if you call file.read() again on the same file object, it will already have reached the end of the file, so it will only return an empty string.

Instead, try e.g. reopening the file:

from StringIO import *

file = open('1.bmp', 'r')
print file.read(), '\n'
file.close()

file2 = open('1.bmp', 'r')
print StringIO(file2.read()).getvalue()
file2.close()

You can also use the with statement to make that code cleaner:

from StringIO import *

with open('1.bmp', 'r') as file:
    print file.read(), '\n'

with open('1.bmp', 'r') as file2:
    print StringIO(file2.read()).getvalue()

As an aside, I would recommend opening binary files in binary mode: open('1.bmp', 'rb')

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you're right. That didn't completely solve my real world problem, then I figured out I was writing the data in 'w' mode and getting corrupt files, not 'wb'. Now everything works :) – Joelmc Sep 26 '11 at 17:48

The second file.read() actually returns just an empty string. You should do file.seek(0) to rewind the internal file offset.

share|improve this answer

Shouldn't you be using "rb" to open, instead of just "r", since this mode assumes that you'll be processing only ASCII characters and EOFs?

share|improve this answer
    
On some platforms (and everywhere on Python 3) just r means binary mode. Also, please also don't add taglines / signatures to your posts. – agf Sep 28 '11 at 17:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.