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I have a server side function that requires login. If the user is logged in the function will return 1 on success. If not, the function will return the login-page.

I want to call the function using Ajax and jQuery. What I do is submit the request with an ordinary link, with a click-function applied on it. If the user is not logged in or the function fails, I want the Ajax-call to return true, so that the href triggers.

However, when I use the following code, the function exits before the Ajax call is done.

How can I redirect the user gracefully to the loginpage?

$(".my_link").click(
    function(){
    $.ajax({
        url: $(this).attr('href'),
        type: 'GET',
        cache: false,
        timeout: 30000,
        error: function(){
            return true;
        },
        success: function(msg){ 
            if (parseFloat(msg)){
                return false;
            } else {
                return true;
            }
        }
    });
});
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4 Answers 4

up vote 169 down vote accepted

If you don't want the $.ajax() function to return immediately, set the async option to false:

$(".my_link").click(
    function(){
    $.ajax({
        url: $(this).attr('href'),
        type: 'GET',
        async: false,
        cache: false,
        timeout: 30000,
        error: function(){
            return true;
        },
        success: function(msg){ 
            if (parseFloat(msg)){
                return false;
            } else {
                return true;
            }
        }
    });
});

But, I would note that this would be counter to the point of ajax also, and you should be handling the response in the error and success functions. Those functions will only be called when the response is received from the server.

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You mean false :) I guess? –  veggerby Apr 16 '09 at 12:32
    
Hah! Yes, thanks. –  altCognito Apr 16 '09 at 12:33
8  
Passing along good practices, in my opinion, isn't judging, and is the mark of some of the best answers here on StackOverflow. –  semperos Aug 1 '11 at 14:14
15  
Never use async: false. The browser's event loop will hang while waiting on unreliable network I/O. There's always a better way. In this case, the link's target can verify the user session and 302 to the login page. –  Matthew Dec 14 '11 at 1:58
1  
For testing, async: false can be very useful. –  Jarrett Sep 9 '13 at 20:14

The underlying XMLHttpRequest object (used by jQuery to make the request) supports the asynchronous property. Set it to false. Like

async: false
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I am using not $.ajax but the $.post and $.get functions so if I need to wait for the response i use this:

$.ajaxSetup({async: false});
$.get("...");
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This works for $.getJSON() as well... which makes sense –  Mark B Aug 10 '12 at 21:08

I think things would be easier if you code your success function to load the appropriate page instead of returning true or false.

For example instead of returning true you could do:

window.location="appropriate page";

That way when the success function is called the page gets redirected.

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