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I want to have a inside of another that will serve as a background to the container and sit behind all of the other elements inside of the container. The HTML would be something like so:

<div id='container'>
    <div>Blah</div>
    <input type='text'/>
    <input type='submit'/>
    <div id='background'>
        <img.../>
        Some Text Maybe?
    </div>
</div>

My failed CSS:

#background{
    float:left;
    z-index:-999;
    background-color:black;
    height:'+o.height+'px;
    width:'+o.width+'px;
}

The 0.variables are from a jQuery plugin I'm making this for - basically the div should be the same height and width that the parent is.

Where I currently stand: My background sits below the sibling elements (along the y-axis not the z). When I play around with the position property, it either places the element behind the parent or it has no effect.

What I ultimately am trying to do is create a jQuery plugin that adds an animated background to a specified element. I'm not even sure if what I'm trying to do with the CSS is possible.

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2 Answers 2

Try putting the background as the container's first child, then using position: absolute;. Mess around with the z-index until it works.

Also, you may need to specify a "more negative" z-index on the <body>, otherwise your background element will end up behind the body (and thus invisible).

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Position: absolute; on the background at least got it to display, but it now pushes the other elements outside of the parent. My goal is to alter the existing elements as little as possible. Edit: Nevermind, it only placed the background behind the parent. –  jreed121 Sep 26 '11 at 19:09

z-index can't be a negative number. Instead use positive z-index for the other elements, so that they can be shown over the element with z-index 0.

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Can too. I've done something like this myself, with z-index: -1, works perfectly. –  Niet the Dark Absol Sep 26 '11 at 18:52
    
Yes, it could be negative. My mistake. –  Debiprasad Sep 26 '11 at 19:02

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