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Given this code:

counter = 0;
$('div').each(function () {
    counter++;
    console.log(counter + ': Timeout is: ' + $(this).index() * 150);
    setTimeout(testTime(), $(this).index() * 150);
});

function testTime() {
    var currentDate = new Date();
    console.log(counter + ': Call time is: ' + currentDate.getMilliseconds());
}

If you look at the console log you can see the millisecond it is called on and the supposed delay in between each call. As you can see each call is only a few milliseconds between each one.

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1  
Don't hide essential parts of your question on other websites. – Quentin Sep 26 '11 at 19:12
    
What's the question? – Jonathan M Sep 26 '11 at 19:13
    
If you're using $(this).index() to get the current index in the enumeration, you should use the first argument passed to your .each() callback instead. Instead of using a simple number that's already provided, you're currently calculating the number as the index value of this from among its siblings. – user113716 Sep 26 '11 at 19:56
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first argument to setTimeout should be a function.

You are calling testTime and passing its return value (undefined) as that argument.

Get rid of the ().

Update in response to comments:

If you need to pass arguments, then you need to either need to pass them in an array as the third argument (as per the documentation) or, for wider browser support, use a closure.

counter = 0;
$('div').each(function () {
    counter++;
    console.log(counter + ': Timeout is: ' + $(this).index() * 150);
    setTimeout(testTimeFactory(foo, bar, baz), $(this).index() * 150);
});

function testTime() {
    var currentDate = new Date();
    console.log(counter + ': Call time is: ' + currentDate.getMilliseconds());
}

function testTimeFactory(a, b, c) {
    return function() {
        testTime(a, b, c);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What if I need to pass arguments to testTime? (Which I do in the actual context I am trying to use this in) – Connor Burton Sep 26 '11 at 19:14
    
@ConnorBurton setTimeout(function(){testTime(arg1, arg2, ...)}, time); – Neal Sep 26 '11 at 19:15
    
@Connor Burton — Updated the answer. – Quentin Sep 26 '11 at 19:18
    
@Neal — Since there is a loop, the odds are that whatever arg1 and so on are, they'll change before the timer reaches zero (as they are updated for the next item in the loop). – Quentin Sep 26 '11 at 19:19
    
Thanks, that works great! – Connor Burton Sep 26 '11 at 19:20

In your code you were calling the function in the timeout immediately.

Try this: http://jsfiddle.net/maniator/VSQ4j/2/
setTimeout(testTime, $(this).index() * 150);

share|improve this answer

The problem is the call to setTimeout. You need to be passing a function to the first parameter but instead you're invoking a function. Change the call to the following

setTimeout(testTime, $(this).index() * 150);
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