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At my workplace, it has been suggested that each developer is given the opportunity to indicate to his peers that he is busy and cannot be disturbed. This would be done in order to ensure that you don't get disturbed, when you are "in the zone".

Do you think this is a good idea ? Do you have anything like that at your workplace ?

I am also wondering how it would be best to indicate the "busy status". It should be something physical that can be seen by everyone in the office. This is for an open-room office; so closing a door cannot be used.

What would you suggest ?

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Voted to close: "subjective and argumentative". –  Andrew Hare Apr 16 '09 at 13:18
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When you are in the zone, it is difficult to remember to turn on a busy indicator. When you leave the zone, it is difficult to remember to turn off a busy indicator. –  Brian Apr 16 '09 at 13:20
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I think this is an interesting idea, BTW shouldn't a bit more easy going on these subjects? Aren't they so much better than "how can exit from a loop" questions? –  dr. evil Apr 16 '09 at 13:22
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Shouldn't you always be busy at work? –  Joe Philllips Apr 16 '09 at 13:29
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how about a hardhat with a flashing light on top? –  RYFN Apr 16 '09 at 13:30
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closed as not constructive by casperOne Feb 6 '12 at 19:17

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18 Answers

up vote 32 down vote accepted

I and at least a couple of my co-workers do, though it's informal.

My own signal is that I have my headphones on. If my headphones are on, it's a sign that I'm trying to tune out external distractions and get into flow.

I've also seen an informal triangular pyramid used, with each side a different color saying something like "Not busy", "Interruptable", and "Not interruptable."

Another of my colleagues uses a much less subtle approach. He's built a chain out of paperclips that he hangs across his cubicle entry with a sign that hangs down, saying "Do not disturb."

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+1 for headphones - when I am 'head-down' in the middle of something, I usually listen to music and people know that I am stuck into something and they know that, although they can interrupt if it is important, I would prefer to be left alone. –  Gordon Mackie JoanMiro Apr 16 '09 at 14:06
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+1 for headphones. Big chunky Sennheisers usually do the trick. Sadly not always ;). –  RedBlueThing Apr 16 '09 at 15:12
    
Yeah, I use a nice pair of Sennheisers. I love their bass. :) –  Greg D Apr 16 '09 at 16:37
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+1 for paperclip chain. The webdev girls in the next cubicle have one so they can get stuff done. –  geofftnz Apr 17 '09 at 2:56
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+1 for the Sennheisers, there's nothing better! It's almost time to replace my HD555's as they've taken quite a beating. –  Kaleb Brasee Nov 17 '09 at 3:25
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This goes well with Joel's "every developer should have an office" quote... thus if you have an office... Door open means come on in... Door closed means I'm busy.

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Yeah, but doors are useless when 99% of your (ka-kling! blink, blink, blink...) interaction with coworkers happens (ka-kling! blink, blink, blink...) via Instant Messaging. The blessings of technology and their curse. (3 taskbar buttons: blink, blink, blink) –  Euro Micelli Apr 17 '09 at 16:01
    
@Euro however there is a "Busy" setting on IM clients, and people need to respect that. –  Nathan Koop Apr 17 '09 at 16:26
    
Switching to webmail vs. Outlook helped with the email dings. Now I don't have a new mail notifier so I only check when I'm between tasks or expecting a message. –  Michael Haren Apr 17 '09 at 18:02
    
@Nathan: indeed, and if your IM doesn't suck it won't even flash, if you're "busy". –  DanMan Oct 21 '10 at 17:55
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I used to have a problem where I couldn't get my work done because of the constant interuptions. My boss at the time wanted me to setup office hours when I would make myself available (Which I refused to do). I would have much rather had a do not disturb sign.

A traffic signal would be a good way to indicate. Green means you can go and ask me questions, Yellow means ask but only if its important. And red means stop turn around I'm busy come back later.

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maybe some USB traffic lights -> usbjuice.com/uncategorized/usb-traffic-lights –  Nathan W Apr 16 '09 at 13:38
    
Sweet and they're not to costly either. When I find myself working on a team again I'll have to pick some up –  JoshBerke Apr 16 '09 at 13:44
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What do you think about this solution? ;-)

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I prefer this one: thinkgeek.com/geektoys/cubegoodies/a1c2 :-) –  marc_s Apr 16 '09 at 13:48
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I've never find it really annoying to be disturbed. sometimes it's good to be disturbed, because you have to get back into 'the zone', which makes you re-analyze the problem.

it's never wrong to take a step back and re-analyze your problems, I'm convinced it is a good thing. so, being disturbed to solve someone else's problems might solve yours.. eventually..

of course, in the office where I work (we do not have cubicals or offices .. just desks) the 'disturbance-rate' is not that high.

I personally think something like a traffic signal might be a bit aggressive, I'd like to be open to people's questions as much as possible. Then again, in the office where I work there are only programmers, which makes it easier.

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You obviously have it pretty easy. Not every office is quiet enough. But interesting thought on the good to come from an interruption. –  dwc Apr 16 '09 at 13:40
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Although, the physical indicator works in some scenarios, a lot of communication ( in my office at least) happen via IM or email. Therefore, you need an electronic indicator as well. Being a developer, you should totally combine the two. Having some sort of phyical device like the stoplight mentioned, but have it be controled by your IM status or your Outlook status

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I think I might prefer that the other way around, I think. So toggling the physical indicator (which shows to people physically around me that I'm not to be disturbed at the moment) toggles my online IM status. ;-) –  peSHIr Apr 16 '09 at 14:37
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If someone feels it important to disturb you, no traffic signals or paperclip chains will stop them. The closed door would be probably the most effective solution, but I know it's impossible to change your open-space env. (it has nonetheless its pros) into a labyrinth of open/closed doors.

I like the headphones idea. Even if someone dares to disturb you, speaks up to you, one can still pretend not to have heard, and this feigned ignorance usually snuffs out other people's interest to speak to you. But you can't suggest to all developers to wear headphones when they're busy. For example, I can't listen to music when I'm in the zone. I need silence. So what can a developer like me do in an open space env. (btw i work in this env.) ? Well... go for a cuppa, relax a little, chat with a colleague and get used to the idea that not everything is going to get done today.

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There are headphones that can play white noise - you still get the noise canceling effect but it's basically silence for you. –  Andrei Krotkov Apr 17 '09 at 3:13
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At our office we have introduced an idea called the 'Interruption Day' where each developer is assigned a day of the week where they are the go-to person for that day. This way, if another developer has a question, they go to the interruption person for that day first. The same goes for support staff, if they have a bug or a client question, the interruption day person is the one that handles that.

I find the best thing about this idea is that when it is your interruption day, you are expecting to be interrupted often, so you focus your attention on smaller items that don't require as much deep concentration. When it is not your day, you know you will not have many interruptions.

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That might work well if everyone is at least somewhat familiar with all parts of the product. There are parts of our product that I know nothing about, so I couldn't possibly answer questions about them. –  Graeme Perrow Apr 17 '09 at 13:24
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I didn't mention it in my original answer, but another goal of our interruption days is cross-training. Even though I might not know much about the product or the problem, by at least looking into it I will eventually learn more about how it works. If it is a problem that we are unable to figure out, we can re-direct the question to the appropriate person when they are available. In that sense we are a shield of sorts for each other's concentration. –  Wally Lawless Apr 17 '09 at 14:27
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This sounds like a fantastic idea, I'm interested to know how its worked for you? What size is your team? Aside from the primary goal of minimizing interruptions, I love the side effect of forcing cross-training and knowledge sharing across a team. –  Alex Jul 17 '11 at 3:57
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I guess as a developer you are busy 24/7! But people do not care!

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How about a tazer?

Zap, zap, zap zap, "Can't you see how freaking busy I am Hans Bricks?!!!!!".

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+1 for the "if only I could" –  Bob The Janitor Apr 16 '09 at 14:50
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Well, we use MSN Messenger internally, and we're connected all day; we use its statuses for this... "Busy" means Busy, "Online" means you can come and ask me questions, and "Away" means I'm not at my desk, so don't bother getting up.

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Whatever happened to the good old verbal "I'm abit busy right now, could this wait till abit later?" A human touch is always better than some artificial, anti-social external sign.

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Unfortunately that breaks you out of the zone - so you might as well answer the question. –  Douglas Leeder Apr 16 '09 at 13:52
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It takes time to turn around and say it, and that alone might be enough to bring the flow crashing to the ground like so many juggled eggs. If the interrupter has a particularly startling voice (~1 out of 4 people in my office qualify), I get knocked out of concentration before I even turn around. –  Greg D Apr 16 '09 at 13:52
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I am lucky enough that I can close my door.

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and you are modest enough not to brag about it ;) –  Peter Perháč Apr 16 '09 at 14:28
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I don't really see the point, in my experince most of the people who bug me will bug me even if I actually tell them to go away.

the biggest one ive seen from others is to put their phone headset on so it looks like they are talking to someone and pretty much everyone will leave you alone ( except the for mentioned people)

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At my old job we had a bunch of yellow plastic chain that we would hang across the cube door. it was simple and very affective. I miss it, where I'm at right now I have to live with ear plugs.

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The office manager at my company when I started was kind of a slacker. She'd put up a nicely made sign on her door not to disturb her as she was "doing payroll." She eventually left and we got a new office manager who isn't nearly as slackerly.

So I commandeered the sign and when I'm busy I flip it out so people run into it when they walk around the corner to my desk.

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Short of a blaring klaxon, I usually find the Outlook calendar works fine for this: block off sections of time as "busy". If your coworkers have a good sense of humor, arm your cube with nerf artillery.

Is it a good idea? Yes. In some environments, like the one where I work, developers are interrupted constantly by phonecalls, meetings, etc. Developers really need some solo time to get their [vulgar mumbling] done.

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Assuming they look at your calender, where I used to work no one would bother looking at the calender. Even when scheduling meetings. Getting double or even tripple booked was common. So there is no way they would check the calender on a simple question –  JoshBerke Apr 16 '09 at 13:33
    
I think its different in every environment. At my last company, no one used their calendar. Ever. Meetings and schedules were informal and shared by word of mouth. Current company is completely different: people live and die by their calendar. –  Juliet Apr 16 '09 at 14:24
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Open-room office and distraction goes hand in hand IMHO. If your boss really doesn't want you to get disturbed, then he should invest in private office (with a door).

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