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I was reading this question Deleting a const pointer and wanted to know more about delete behavior. Now, as per my understanding:

delete expression works in two steps:

  1. invoke destructor
  2. then releases the memory (often with a call to free()) by calling operator delete.

operator delete accepts a void*. As part of a test program I overloaded operator delete and found that operator delete doesn't accept const pointer.

Since operator delete does not accept const pointer and delete internally calls operator delete, how does Deleting a const pointer work ?

Does delete uses const_cast internally?

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@ aJ. Good Question! – nitin_cherian Jul 6 '12 at 9:33
up vote 11 down vote accepted

const_cast doesn't really do anything – it's a way to suppress compiler moaning about const-ness of the object. delete keyword is a compiler construct, the compiler knows what to do in this case and doesn't care about const-ness of the pointer.

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As this answer says, delete is not a method like any other, but a part of the langage to destruct objects. const-ness has no bearing on destructability.

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operator delete accepts a void*. As part of a test program I overloaded operator delete and found that operator delete doesn't accept const pointer.

How did you try this? It certainly does accept const pointers:

#include <memory>

int main() {
    void* const px = 0;
    delete px;
    ::operator delete(px);
}

This code is correct, compiles (albeit with a justified warning) and executes.

EDIT: Reading the original article – you aren't talking about a const pointer but a pointer to const, which is something else. The reason why this has to work is described there. As for why it's working: others have said this.

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delete is an operator that you can overload. It takes a pointer as an argument, and frees the memory, possibly using free. The compiler allows this whether the pointer is const or not.

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5  
This isn't actually correct. A fine but important distinction has to be drawn between the operator delete (cannot be changed) and the function operator delete (which can be). The former calls the latter but they are not identical. – Konrad Rudolph Apr 16 '09 at 13:49
    
@Konrad Rudolph, yes, that's true, but it doesn't make that much of a difference. – Zifre Apr 16 '09 at 13:54

delete just makes a call to deallocate the memory the pointer points to, it doesn't change the value of the pointer nor the object. Therefore, delete has nothing to do with the const-ness of the pointer or object pointed to.

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