Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the below regular expression in Python,

^1?$|^(11+?)\1+$

Since there is a pipe '|', I will split it into 2 regex,

^1?$

For this, it should validate 1 or empty value. Am I correct?

^(11+?)\1+$

For the above regex, it would validate value of 1111. The first pair of 11 is based on (11+?) and the second pair of 11 is due to \1.

When I attempt to execute it in Python, it returns true only for 1111 but not 11 or empty value. Am I wrong somewhere?

share|improve this question
3  
Hm, prime-vs-composite numbers in unary notation via regexes? –  tchrist Sep 26 '11 at 21:16
    
Yes, trying to write a regex for it. You're good. :) –  Ted Sep 26 '11 at 21:19
    
@tchrist, nicely spotted! I was kind of stumped after I saw it matched 111111111 (9 1's), and then it occured to me the \1+ was matching 3 times 3 1's. :) –  Bart Kiers Sep 26 '11 at 21:21
    
Ted, you might want to edit your post to include what you're actually trying to match: we're not all as smart as tchrist! :) –  Bart Kiers Sep 26 '11 at 21:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ted wrote:

For this, it should validate 1 or empty value. Am I correct?

Yes, that is correct.

Ted wrote:

When I attempt to execute it in Python, it returns true only for 1111 but not 11 or empty value. Am I wrong somewhere?

The empty string does get matched. The following snippet:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import re

for n in xrange(0, 51):
  ones = '1' * n
  matches = re.match(r'^1?$|^(11+?)\1+$', ones)
  if matches:
    div1 = n if matches.group(1) is None else len(matches.group(1))
    div2 = 0 if div1 is 0 else len(ones)/div1
    print "[{0:2}]:{1:2} * {2:2} = '{3}'".format(n, div1, div2, ones)

will print:

[ 0]: 0 *  0 = ''
[ 1]: 1 *  1 = '1'
[ 4]: 2 *  2 = '1111'
[ 6]: 2 *  3 = '111111'
[ 8]: 2 *  4 = '11111111'
[ 9]: 3 *  3 = '111111111'
[10]: 2 *  5 = '1111111111'
[12]: 2 *  6 = '111111111111'
[14]: 2 *  7 = '11111111111111'
[15]: 3 *  5 = '111111111111111'
[16]: 2 *  8 = '1111111111111111'
[18]: 2 *  9 = '111111111111111111'
[20]: 2 * 10 = '11111111111111111111'
[21]: 3 *  7 = '111111111111111111111'
[22]: 2 * 11 = '1111111111111111111111'
[24]: 2 * 12 = '111111111111111111111111'
[25]: 5 *  5 = '1111111111111111111111111'
[26]: 2 * 13 = '11111111111111111111111111'
[27]: 3 *  9 = '111111111111111111111111111'
[28]: 2 * 14 = '1111111111111111111111111111'
[30]: 2 * 15 = '111111111111111111111111111111'
[32]: 2 * 16 = '11111111111111111111111111111111'
[33]: 3 * 11 = '111111111111111111111111111111111'
[34]: 2 * 17 = '1111111111111111111111111111111111'
[35]: 5 *  7 = '11111111111111111111111111111111111'
[36]: 2 * 18 = '111111111111111111111111111111111111'
[38]: 2 * 19 = '11111111111111111111111111111111111111'
[39]: 3 * 13 = '111111111111111111111111111111111111111'
[40]: 2 * 20 = '1111111111111111111111111111111111111111'
[42]: 2 * 21 = '111111111111111111111111111111111111111111'
[44]: 2 * 22 = '11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111'
[45]: 3 * 15 = '111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111'
[46]: 2 * 23 = '1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111'
[48]: 2 * 24 = '111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111'
[49]: 7 *  7 = '1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111'
[50]: 2 * 25 = '11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111'

And the input 11 is not matched because 11 is matched in group 1 ((11+?)), which should then be repeated at least once (\1+), which is not the case (it is not repeated).

share|improve this answer
    
For the first set of regex, ^1?$, empty value is matched, but why isn't 1 or 11 matched? Since 1 fits the matching in ^1 and 11 fits the matching in 1?. –  Ted Sep 26 '11 at 21:11
    
@Ted, the empty string and "1" are matched. See my (slightly) edited answer. –  Bart Kiers Sep 26 '11 at 21:25
    
Thanks! I was mistaken about the (^1?$). I thought it means 1 or 11 due to the ? metacharacter (zero or one). –  Ted Sep 26 '11 at 21:30
    
@Ted, ah I see. Then you probably meant: ^11?$|^(11+?)\1+$ –  Bart Kiers Sep 26 '11 at 21:31
    
It is not really necessary to have the complex regex to match a lines on 1's or a blank. Why not r'^(1?)|(1+)$? –  the wolf Sep 27 '11 at 6:07

You have a + after the \1 meaning a greedy 1 or more.

Are you trying to match 1 between 1 and 4 times?

Use:

r'^(1+){1,4}$'

The easiest is to use one of the great regex tools out there. Here is my favorite. With the same site, you can see why your regex does not work.

Here is a site that explains regex's.

share|improve this answer
    
With or without the + after \1, the input "11" still is not matched, and the empty string will be matched. In other words: the + is as far as I understand not the problem. Unless I am misinterpreting things... –  Bart Kiers Sep 26 '11 at 21:09
    
@Bart Kiers: Well it is a little unclear what the OP is trying to do ;-) I interpreted it that he wanted to split a regex and have the second match a line with 1, 11, 111, or 1111. His regex only matches 1111 out of that set. –  dawg Sep 26 '11 at 21:25
    
Err, no, "1" is also matched. I agree with you that it's a bit unclear though! :) –  Bart Kiers Sep 26 '11 at 21:29
    
Bart Kiers: The regex of '^(11+?)\1+$' most assuredly does not match "1". There is the literal 1 followed by 1 or more literal 1 characters in a capture group. So 11 followed by any number of additional 1's. If he replaced both + with * to make the second 1 optional and the capture group optional, THEN it would match 1... –  dawg Sep 26 '11 at 21:43
    
I didn't say "1" is matched by '^(11+?)\1+$'. Please see the original pattern in the OP: ^1?$|^(11+?)\1+$, which does match "1" (the part: ^1?$, to be precise). See my answer: is contains a demo you can run. –  Bart Kiers Sep 26 '11 at 21:45

If you want the second expression to match '11', '1111', '111111', etc. Use:

^(1+)\1$
share|improve this answer

I think you need more parenthesis to define what the | refers to. I would write the regex like this:

/^(1?|^(11+?)\2+)$/

note there is only one start and end used

share|improve this answer
    
Nope, that matches exactly the same as ^1?$|^(11+?)\1+$ –  Bart Kiers Sep 26 '11 at 21:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.