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I'm trying to fix an old script written for me. I need it to run without <body onload="init ();">. I'd like to run the function from inside the script without inline code like that command. Sorry I'm not a JS expert but how do I do this?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted
<script type="text/javascript">
    function init() {
        // Put your code here
    }
    window.onload = init;
</script>

Or, if you are using jQuery:

$(function() {
    // Your code here
});
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2  
Aaaaand... again... I'm to slow... because I wanted to throw together an example :\ jsfiddle.net/Fx8JW oh well... +1 –  Joseph Marikle Sep 26 '11 at 21:11

In a pure JavaScript implementation, you'd want to wait for the page to be ready to invoke your events. The simplest solution is like so:

<script type="text/javascript" language="javascript">
      window.onload = function()
      {
          init();
      };
</script>

But that's not much better than your original implementation via placing that on the tag itself. What you can do is wait for a specific event though:

 document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", function()
 {
     init();
 }, false);

This should be fired a little earlier in the cycle and should do nicely.

Additionally, if you are using jQuery, you can simply add a function to be executed when that event is fired using the simple syntax:

 $(document).ready(function() // or $(function()
 {
     init();
 });
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Yours is the best answer, although I suggest including Prototype's version as well: Event.observe(window, 'load', function(e) {}); –  Izkata Sep 27 '11 at 2:30
    
The second one is perfect! Specially if you are using iframes! –  Playmaker Jun 15 '12 at 10:27

best option is to just put the call to init() at the bottom of the page:

<html>

<head>
...
</head>

<body>
.... page content here ...
<script type="text/javascript">init();</script>
</body>
</html>

By placing it at the bottom like that, you'll be sure that it runs as pretty much the very last thing on the page. However, note that it's not as reliable as using the onload option in the body tag, or jquery's $('document').ready() or mootool's window.addEvent('domready', ...).

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Here's a slight variation on Tejs' response. I often find it more readable and manageable to separate the init() function from the code registering the event handler:

function init(e) {

    //statements...

}

document.addEventListener('DOMContentLoaded', init, false);

Also, in place of an explicit init() function, I've sometimes used a self-executing anonymous function placed at the very, very bottom of the page, just before the </body> tag:

(function() {

    //statements...

})();
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<script type="text/javascript">
    function init() {
        // Put your code here
    }
    window.onload = init;
</script>

it is not work should be use this

<script type="text/javascript">
    function init() {
        // Put your code here
    }
    window.onload = init();
</script>
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1  
The second version is incorrect: when the script section is reached it immediately executes init and stores its return value in window.onload, which is not the required behaviour. –  Matthew Trevor Jan 31 at 14:57

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