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Given the following:

template<typename T>
class A
{
public:
    static const unsigned int ID = ?;
};

I want ID to generate a unique compile time ID for every T. I've considered __COUNTER__ and the boost PP library but have been unsuccessful so far. How can I achieve this?

Edit: ID has to be usable as the case in a switch statement

Edit2: All the answers based on the address of a static method or member are incorrect. Although they do create a unique ID they are not resolved in compile time and therefore can not be used as the cases of a switch statement.

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Oh, I'd love to see an answer to this one. AFAIK, there is no solution with the current state of affairs in C++. –  K-ballo Sep 26 '11 at 22:29
    
Macros aren't going to be reevaluated when the template is instantiated, so that's never going to work. –  Mark Ransom Sep 26 '11 at 22:31
1  
If you can manage to find a compile-time hash function, make a hash of __FILE__ and __LINE__. –  tenfour Sep 26 '11 at 22:34
3  
@tenfour: That would get evaluated the same for all T. –  Mooing Duck Sep 26 '11 at 22:53
1  
Also, why do you need this compile-time counter? –  bdonlan Sep 26 '11 at 23:54

7 Answers 7

This is sufficient assuming a standards conforming compiler (with respect to the one definition rule):

template<typename T>
class A
{
public:
    static char ID_storage;
    static const void * const ID;
};

template<typename T> char A<T>::ID_storage;
template<typename T> const void * const A<T>::ID= &A<T>::ID_storage;

From the C++ standard 3.2.5 One definition rule [basic.def.odr] (bold emphasis mine):

... If D is a template and is defined in more than one translation unit, then the last four requirements from the list above shall apply to names from the template’s enclosing scope used in the template definition (14.6.3), and also to dependent names at the point of instantiation (14.6.2). If the definitions of D satisfy all these requirements, then the program shall behave as if there were a single definition of D. If the definitions of D do not satisfy these requirements, then the behavior is undefined.

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I would make that a void * - you're only interested in equality comparison, and so there's no need to expose the implementation detail that you're pointing to chars –  bdonlan Sep 26 '11 at 23:48
4  
Is not sufficient, each compilation unit will get its own copy of the values. To work they should be defined in a CPP, per the one definition rule, but it can't be done since they are templates. –  K-ballo Sep 26 '11 at 23:57
    
@K-ballo, do you have a standard reference for that? –  bdonlan Sep 26 '11 at 23:59
1  
@bdonlan: For what? The one definition rule? Or the fact that static objects defined within a header file will be defined in each translation unit that includes them? Remember that #include is no different than copy & paste the file contents... –  K-ballo Sep 27 '11 at 0:01
1  
@MSN: Nice... but not usable at compile-time. AFAIK the compile-time generation of unique IDs is impossible. Note that using a pointer to a private static function (somewhat like the Safe Bool idiom) would work equally well, and still not answer the question. –  Matthieu M. Sep 27 '11 at 6:31

Use the memory address of a static function.

template<typename T>
class A  {
public:
    static void ID() {}
}; 

(&(A<int>::ID)) will be different from (&(A<char>::ID)) and so on.

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Compiler complains: "‘ID’ was not declared in this scope" + "‘&’ cannot appear in a constant-expression" –  foxcub Sep 26 '11 at 23:01
2  
In order to take the address of a static constant integral (note your missing the const modifier), such integral has to be defined in an appropiate CPP file which cannot be done with templates. Is undefined behavior otherwise; and if the static is declared within the header file you'll get different addresses at different compilation units. –  K-ballo Sep 26 '11 at 23:01
    
Updated it to use function pointers instead. –  Pubby Sep 26 '11 at 23:14
    
Does the C++ standard really guarantee this for ints? This can certainly fail on 64-bit platforms at least –  bdonlan Sep 26 '11 at 23:35
1  
@bdonlan: Actually that's not guaranteed since it will get different addresses in different compilation units. Besides, even within the same compilation unit, compilers like MSVC refuse that as they optimize all functions to point to the same one. –  K-ballo Sep 26 '11 at 23:56

This seems to work OK for me:

template<typename T>
class Counted
{
  public:
  static int id()
  {
    static int v;
    return (int)&v;
  }
};

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  std::cout<<"Counted<int>::id()="<<Counted<int>::id()<<std::endl;
  std::cout<<"Counted<char>::id()="<<Counted<char>::id()<<std::endl;

}
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1  
That works ok for your use case, now move the definition of Counted to a header of its own, and include it from different translation units. –  K-ballo Sep 27 '11 at 0:11
    
@K-ballo Seems to work OK for my simple test case with multiple translation units. Do you have a case where it fails? –  Michael Anderson Sep 27 '11 at 0:28
    
Mmmh, actually this approach seems to work. The standard guarantees that all translation units will point to the same v object. –  K-ballo Sep 27 '11 at 0:37
    
I think the result of id() is evaluated in run time. –  Dave Sep 27 '11 at 1:07
    
@Dave - Ah yeah, it mat not be a compile time constant. I missed that part in the question. –  Michael Anderson Sep 27 '11 at 3:09

I encountered this exact problem recently. My solution:

counter.hpp

class counter
{
    static int i;
    static nexti()
    {
        return i++;
    }
};

Counter.cpp:

int counter::i = 0;

templateclass.hpp

#include "counter.hpp"

    template <class T>
    tclass
    {
        static const int id;
    };

    template <class T>
    int tclass<T>::id = counter::nexti();

It appers to work properly in MSVC and GCC, with the one exception that you can't use it in a switch statement.

For various reasons I actually went further, and defined a preprocessor macro that creates a new class from a given name parameter with a static ID (as above) that derives from a common base.

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If non-monotonous values and an intptr_t are acceptable:

template<typename T>
struct TypeID
{
private:
    static char id_ref;
public:
    static const intptr_t ID;
};

template<typename T>
  char TypeID<T>::id_ref;
template<typename T>
  const intptr_t TypeID<T>::ID = (intptr_t)&TypeID<T>::id_ref;

If you must have ints, or must have monotonically incrementing values, I think using static constructors is the only way to go:

// put this in a namespace
extern int counter;

template<typename T>
class Counter {
private:
  Counter() {
    ID_val = counter++;
  }
  static Counter init;
  static int ID_val;
public:
  static const int &ID;
};

template<typename T>
  Counter<T> Counter<T>::init;
template<typename T>
  int Counter<T>::ID_val;
template<typename T>
  const int &Counter<T>::ID = Counter<T>::ID_val;

// in a non-header file somewhere
int counter;

Note that neither of these techniques is safe if you are sharing them between shared libraries and your application!

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1  
Could you explain what you mean by shared libraries (dll, lib or else) and why it's not safe to share between them. –  ALOToverflow Mar 24 '13 at 18:40

This can't be done. An address to a static object is the closest you can get to a unique id, however in order to take addresses of such objects (even static const integrals) they must be defined somewhere. Per the one definition rule, they should be defined within a CPP file, which cannot be done since they are templates. If you define the statics within a header file, then each compilation unit will get its own version of it implemented of course at different addresses.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

It appears this is impossible without C++11's constexpr. Many of the other answers show a good way to generate a unique ID based on the address of a static method/member, but they are not resolved in compile time.

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7  
So this is the answer? You could at least include the constexpr way to do it... –  K-ballo Sep 29 '11 at 1:51

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