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In Internet Explorer 8, it is possible to override CSS styles and HTML tags using:

Tools -> Internet Options -> Accessibility (button) -> Format documents using my style sheet (check box).

There I can specify a file containing my own CSS snippet. Specifying the "!important" modifier causes the CSS code to override existing formatting.

Is there a way to do this or something similar in Outlook 2007? I understand that Outlook 2007 uses the Word 2007 HTML and CSS engine. Therefore, a solution for Word might be applicable to Outlook 2007.

I am attempting to print emails that contain HTML tables. The tables often contain a width setting that is wider than the 8.5-inch page I need to print to. Additionally, the <td nowrap tag is often included. The result is that text is cut off at the right margin.

If I can override the width and nowrap tags, I should be able to prevent truncation. How can I do this?

The ideal solution would be accomplished solely in Word / Outlook and CSS. VBA is an option, but only if it can be applied automatically. Manually running a macro is not an option.

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Are you printing those documents from an email? –  marissajmc Sep 27 '11 at 4:44
    
Yes, I am printing emails. I have edited my original post to state "attempting to print emails" rather than "attempting to print documents". –  Jacob Quisenberry Sep 27 '11 at 16:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is not possible because the Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN) states that

  • media ( screen | print | projection | braille | speech | all )

is not supported in Word 2007 and therefore Outlook 2007.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa338201.aspx

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