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When converting a project to use ARC what does "switch case is in protected scope" mean? I am converting a project to use ARC, using Xcode 4 Edit -> Refactor -> Convert to Objective-C ARC... One of the errors I get is "switch case is in protected scope" on "some" of the switches in a switch case.

Edit, Here is the code:

the ERROR is marked on the "default" case:

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)tableView cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath
{
    static NSString *CellIdentifier = @"";
    UITableViewCell *cell ;
    switch (tableView.tag) {
        case 1:
            CellIdentifier = @"CellAuthor";
            cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
            if (cell == nil) {
                cell = [[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
        }
        cell.textLabel.text = [[prefQueries objectAtIndex:[indexPath row]] valueForKey:@"queryString"];
        break;
    case 2:
        CellIdentifier = @"CellJournal";
        cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
        if (cell == nil) {
            cell = [[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
        }
        cell.textLabel.text = [[prefJournals objectAtIndex:[indexPath row]] valueForKey:@"name"];

        NSData * icon = [[prefJournals objectAtIndex:[indexPath row]] valueForKey:@"icon"];
        if (!icon) {
            icon = UIImagePNGRepresentation([UIImage imageNamed:@"blank72"]);
        }
        cell.imageView.image = [UIImage imageWithData:icon];

        break;

    default:
        CellIdentifier = @"Cell";
        cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
        if (cell == nil) {
            initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier] autorelease];
            cell = [[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
            }
        break;
    }


    return cell;
}
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Post the code of the switch statement. –  Zaph Sep 26 '11 at 23:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 436 down vote accepted

Surround each case itself with braces {}. That should fix the issue (it did for me in one of my projects).

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12  
Wow! It worked! but why?! –  Ali Sep 27 '11 at 0:03
10  
The braces help the compiler understand scope. I know GCC used to issue a warning if you declared a new variable at the first line of a case statement without the braces, and the WWDC 2011 video on ARC mentions something about enclosing cases in braces. If you want to know why, check out that video—I can't remember off the top of my head. –  FeifanZ Sep 27 '11 at 0:16
63  
It's been a while, but I seem to remember something in the C standard that didn't allow variable assignment after a case statement because the code is not really inside of a block. By adding curly braces {...} after the case and before the break, everything inside is in a scoped block and will behave as expected. I've gotten to the point that I just automatically make a block out of my case statements to avoid this kind of problem. –  Paul Sep 27 '11 at 0:16
1  
I ran into the same issue. It is a horrible error message and a bug has been filed (which will be fixed in a future version of the compiler) to correct it. But, yes, the scoping rules within case statements in C are really very... odd. –  bbum Sep 27 '11 at 4:12
36  
This is occurring because you're declaring a new variable within the scope of a case. The compiler doesn't know how this variable should be scoped (does it belong to all of the switches cases or just the current case?) wrapping the case's implementation in brackets creates a scope for the variable to live within so the compiler can properly manage it's lifetime. –  Shinohara Jul 6 '12 at 15:37

Hard to be sure without looking at the code, but it probably means there's some variable declaration going on inside the switch and the compiler can't tell if there's a clear path to the required dealloc point.

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For me, the problem started on the middle of a switch and curly brackets did not worked out, unless you have to include {} IN ALL previous case statements. For me the error came when I had the statement

NSDate *start = [NSDate date];

in the previous case. After I deleted this, then all subsequent case statement came clean from the protected scope error message

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Before:

    case 2:
        NSDate *from = [NSDate dateWithTimeIntervalSince1970:1388552400];
        [self refreshContents:from toDate:[NSDate date]];
        break;

I moved NSDate definition before switch, and it fixed the compile problem:

NSDate *from;  /* <----------- */
switch (index) {
    ....
    case 2:
        from = [NSDate dateWithTimeIntervalSince1970:1388552400];
        [self refreshContents:from toDate:[NSDate date]];
        break;

}
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default:
        CellIdentifier = @"Cell";
        cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
        if (cell == nil) {
            ***initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier] autorelease];***
            cell = [[UITableViewCell alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewCellStyleDefault reuseIdentifier:CellIdentifier];
            }
        break;
    }

Note: Check! The syntax of the bold & italicized line. Rectify it and you are good to go.

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