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I have a base class that contains the following events:

public event EventHandler Loading;
public event EventHandler Finished;

In a class that inherits from this base class I try to raise the event:

this.Loading(this, new EventHandler()); // All we care about is which object is loading.

I receive the following error:

The event 'BaseClass.Loading' can only appear on the left hand side of += or -= (BaseClass')

I am assuming I cannot access these events the same as other inherited members?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 74 down vote accepted

What you have to do , is this:

In your base class (where you have declared the events), create protected methods which can be used to raise the events:

public class MyClass
{
   public event EventHandler Loading;
   public event EventHandler Finished;

   protected virtual void OnLoading(EventArgs e)
   {
       EventHandler handler = Loading;
       if( handler != null )
       {
           handler(this, e);
       }
   }

   protected virtual void OnFinished(EventArgs e)
   {
       EventHandler handler = Finished;
       if( handler != null )
       {
           handler(this, e);
       }
   }
}

(Note that you should probably change those methods, in order to check whether you have to Invoke the eventhandler or not).

Then, in classes that inherit from this base class, you can just call the OnFinished or OnLoading methods to raise the events:

public AnotherClass : MyClass
{
    public void DoSomeStuff()
    {
        ...
        OnLoading(EventArgs.Empty);
        ...
        OnFinished(EventArgs.Empty);
    }
}
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4  
Those methods should be protected virtual unless there's some reason to do otherwise. –  Max Schmeling Apr 16 '09 at 14:07
3  
Why should it be virtual ? I would declare it virtual if I wanted inheritors to change the way the event should be raised, but most of the time, I see no reason to do this ... –  Frederik Gheysels Apr 16 '09 at 14:12
4  
Official guidelines: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/w369ty8x(VS.80).aspx –  meandmycode Apr 16 '09 at 14:17
1  
Regarding making the method virtual, so that inheritors can override the event invocation behaviour: How many times have you been in a situation where this was necessary ? Next to that; in the overriden method, you can't raise the event, since you'll get the same error as the one mentioned by TS. –  Frederik Gheysels Apr 16 '09 at 14:31
3  
@meandmycode: Don't let Microsoft make your design decisions. They can offer recommendations, but you should choose whether or not to follow them. The fact that you have to even implement this silly pattern to fire an inherited event is evidence of how much Microsoft cares about code craftsmanship. –  Verax Mar 1 '12 at 2:20

I am assuming I cannot access these events the same as other inherited members?

Precisely. It's customary to provide a protected function OnXyz or RaiseXyz for each event in the base class to enable raising from inherited classes. For example:

public event EventHandler Loading;

protected virtual void OnLoading() {
    EventHandler handler = Loading;
    if (handler != null)
        handler(this, EventArgs.Empty);
}

Called in the inherited class:

OnLoading();
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You can only access an event in the declaring class, as .NET creates private instance variables behind the scenes that actually hold the delegate. Doing this..

public event EventHandler MyPropertyChanged;

is actually doing this;

private EventHandler myPropertyChangedDelegate;

public event EventHandler MyPropertyChanged
{
    add { myPropertyChangedDelegate += value; }
    remove { myPropertyChangedDelegate -= value; }
}

and doing this...

MyPropertyChanged(this, EventArgs.Empty);

is actually this...

myPropertyChangedDelegate(this, EventArgs.Empty);

So you can (obviously) only access the private delegate instance variable from within the declaring class.

The convention is to provide something like this in the declaring class..

protected virtual void OnMyPropertyChanged(EventArgs e)
{
    EventHandler invoker = MyPropertyChanged;

    if(invoker != null) invoker(this, e);
}

You can then call OnMyPropertyChanged(EventArgs.Empty) from anywhere in that class or below the inheritance heirarchy to invoke the event.

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2  
This is the post that should be marked as the answer. The other one is bad implementation. –  bryan costanich Dec 25 '11 at 20:49
    
I had some issues implementing this... stackoverflow.com/q/10593632/328397 –  makerofthings7 May 15 '12 at 3:07

You can try this way, It works for me:

public delegate void MyEventHaldler(object sender, EventArgs e);

public class B
{
    public virtual event MyEventHaldler MyEvent;
    protected override void OnChanged(EventArgs e)
    {
        if (MyEvent != null)
            MyEvent(this, e);
    }
}

public class D : B
{
    public override event MyEventHaldler MyEvent;
    protected override void OnChanged(EventArgs e)
    {
        if (MyEvent != null)
            MyEvent(this, e);
    }
}
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