Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to figure out how to use jQuery to construct HTML as sanely as possible. As far as I can tell, this should produce <div><span>Alice</span></div>, but instead produces <div>[object Object]</div>:

post = $("<div>");
username = $("<span>").html("Alice");
post.append(username);

I've found that replacing the last line with post.append(username.html()) gets me closer to my goal, but it omits the <span> tags if I do it that way. How do I insert a child element with the surrounding tags, and without writing out "<span>" + username + "</span>", which seems like a novice approach to the task?

EDIT: Stupid mistake. The snippet I posted above was excessively simplified; I was really trying to do post.append(username + another_span_element) in my code. Obviously I can't append objects like that. I've changed it to post.append(username); post.append(another_span_element); and now it works fine. Durr!

share|improve this question
    
A "sane" approach, if you are using innerHTML (which is more or less what the html method does), is to construct the entire html fragment and insert it in one go. That way the parser is called once and it has a fully formed fragment to work with. Calling it in bits just creates extra overhead. –  RobG Sep 26 '11 at 23:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Works for me: $("<div>").append($("<span>").html("Alice"))[0].outerHTML == "<div><span>Alice</span></div>"

share|improve this answer
    
outerHTML only works in some browsers without custom support –  Marshall Sep 26 '11 at 23:37
    
@Marshall I was using it to demonstrate what the content of the element was; I wasn’t suggesting that outerHTML be used for anything. –  Daniel Brockman Sep 26 '11 at 23:38
    
You're right, it does work... my problem was that I was trying to concatenate two <span> objects in my code and then append them both at once. I probably shouldn't have assumed that that would work! –  Fraxtil Sep 26 '11 at 23:47

Is there a reason for not doing:

$('<div><span>Alice</span></div>').appendTo('body');

or

var username = "Alice";
$('<div><span id="user"></span></div>').appendTo('body');
$(username).appendTo('#user');

or

var username = "Alice";
$('<div><span id="user"></span></div>').appendTo('body');
$('#user').html(username);

or

var username = "Alice";
$('<div><span id="user"></span></div>').appendTo('body');
$('#user').text(username);

or any of the other 200 options?

share|improve this answer
    
Mostly because writing the HTML directly as strings doesn't seem 'right' to me. I'd prefer to work with objects and then construct the entire page at the end. Maybe that's a silly reason, but it's how I'm used to writing code. –  Fraxtil Sep 26 '11 at 23:46

What you're aiming for is done with the text() method:

post = $("<div>");
username = $("<span>").text("Alice");
post.append(username);

Example here.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.