Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Is this good enough for a random coupon code generator? Should I check and see if a code has already been used when I make a new code? What are the odds that this will repeat?

$coupon_code = substr(base_convert(sha1(uniqid(mt_rand())), 16, 36), 0, 7);

EDIT - here's my actual code:

$coupon_code = substr(base_convert(sha1(uniqid(mt_rand())), 16, 36), 0, 7);
$numrows = mysql_num_rows(mysql_query("SELECT id FROM generatedcoupons WHERE coupon_code='$coupon_code' LIMIT 1"));
if($numrows>0){
     $coupon_code =  substr(base_convert(sha1(uniqid(rand())), 16, 36), 0, 7);
     $numrows = mysql_num_rows(mysql_query("SELECT id FROM generatedcoupons WHERE coupon_code='$coupon_code' LIMIT 1"));
     if($numrows>0)
          //error, show link to retry
}
share|improve this question
1  
If each item that will have a unique coupon has an ID, then hash the ID. If each purchase transaction that will generate a unique coupon has an ID, then hash that ID. (or, don't hash anything and just use the ID, such that you're using an RDBMS with an INT or other likely candidate type for a primary key) – Northborn Design Sep 27 '11 at 2:02
    
Should I check and see if a code has already been used when I make a new code. If you need each code to be actually uniquely referenced in your system, with no duplicates, and they aren't something like an incrementer: Yes. – Jared Farrish Sep 27 '11 at 2:02
    
@JaredFarrish - they're going to be printed and used with many different "business owners". Sorry if this is a rookie question I have no formal educaiton... – Andypandy Sep 27 '11 at 2:10
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's a coupon system that not only guarantees unique codes, but is very efficient when it comes to looking them up:

// assuming MySQL table with (id, code, effect)
mysql_query( "insert into `coupons` set `effect`='".$effect."'");
// "effect" will be some keyword to identify what the coupon does
$id = mysql_insert_id();
$code = $id."F";
$codelen = 32; // change as needed
for( $i=strlen($code); $i<$codelen; $i++) {
    $code .= dechex(rand(0,15));
}
mysql_query( "update `coupons` set `code`='".$code."' where `id`=".$id);

// now, when you are given a code to redeem, say $_POST['code']
list($code,$effect) = mysql_fetch_row( mysql_query( "select `code`, `effect` from `coupons` where `id`='".((int) $_POST['code'])."'"));
if( $code != $_POST['code']) die("Code not valid");
else {
    // do something based on $effect
}

As you can see, it takes the ID from AUTO_INCREMENT, appends an F, then pads with random hexadecimal characters. You can make $codelen as high as you want, but 32 should be plenty (giving around 16**26 combinations even after the millionth coupon).

share|improve this answer
    
To make it unique, shouldn't it be $code = $id."G"; instead of $code = $id."F";? If it is "F", there's a small probability that it generates an already existent code because F could be also generated on the for loop right? – Cristiano Santos Aug 22 '13 at 16:21
    
No, because the format of the code is: [ID of the coupon in decimal] [literal F] [random hex digits]. Since the ID can never have an F in it, then that F will always be the first non-numeric character. Since the ID part is unique, then all codes are unique. – Niet the Dark Absol Aug 22 '13 at 16:26
    
Ah... Forget, my mistake. What I was thinking would generate, for example "12FFA1C3" and not "12FA1C3" for ID=12 and code=FA1C3. – Cristiano Santos Aug 22 '13 at 17:00
    
So "F" could be any fixed alphabetic character right? – Cristiano Santos Aug 22 '13 at 17:02
1  
Could be. It could even be random, so long as it's a letter and not a number. – Niet the Dark Absol Aug 22 '13 at 20:23

Seems fairly random to me... I'd still probably double check that a code has not already been used when you create one on the very slight off chance that you do get a repetitive number.

And most likely the chances of a repetition are slightly more than 1 in 36^8 or roughly 1:2,821,109,907,456.

Note that since SHA1 gives back 40 digits in a hexadecimal string if you want there to be less chance that it will be duplicated you can always just increase your substr from (0,7) up to (0,29) (you can go even a little higher, but I doubt you want THAT big of a number)

But I defs agree you should have some sort of unique coupon id stored in some database for making sure that you don't have duplicates, and it would be a great way to see how many coupons you guys created (and potentially how many got used? =D)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.