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I've got a bookmarklet which loads jQuery and some other js libraries.

How do I:

  • Wait until the javascript library I'm using is available/loaded. If I try to use the script before it has finished loading, like using the $ function with jQuery before it's loaded, an undefined exception is thrown.
  • Insure that the bookmarklet I load won't be cached (without using a server header, or obviously, being that this is a javascript file: a metatag)

Is anyone aware if onload for dynamically added javascript works in IE? (to contradict this post)

What's the simplest solution, cleanest resolution to these issues?

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"Wait until the javascript library is available" please elaborate this. What are you waiting for? –  Josh Stodola Apr 16 '09 at 14:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 21 down vote accepted

It depends on how you are actually loading jQuery. If you are appending a script element to the page, you can use the same technique that jQuery uses to dynamically load a script.

EDIT: I did my homework and actually extracted a loadScript function from the jQuery code to use in your bookmarklet. It might actually be useful to many (including me).

function loadScript(url, callback)
{
	var head = document.getElementsByTagName("head")[0];
	var script = document.createElement("script");
	script.src = url;

	// Attach handlers for all browsers
	var done = false;
	script.onload = script.onreadystatechange = function()
	{
		if( !done && ( !this.readyState 
					|| this.readyState == "loaded" 
					|| this.readyState == "complete") )
		{
			done = true;

			// Continue your code
			callback();

			// Handle memory leak in IE
			script.onload = script.onreadystatechange = null;
			head.removeChild( script );
		}
	};

	head.appendChild(script);
}


// Usage: 
// This code loads jQuery and executes some code when jQuery is loaded
loadScript("http://code.jquery.com/jquery-latest.js", function()
{
	$('my_element').hide();
});
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2  
piece of art :) –  vsync Sep 9 '09 at 15:39
1  
you don't need to specify type="text/javascript" ? –  vsync Sep 14 '09 at 7:16
1  
not any more. Nowadays browsers assume untyped scripts are javascript –  joeytwiddle Dec 20 '10 at 9:40
    
They do assume that, but is it considered proper form? –  devios Mar 19 '12 at 14:50
    
how can we wrap this to check if a page already has jquery loaded (and a certain version) –  Adi Mar 15 '13 at 12:10

To answer your first question: Javascript is interpreted sequentially, so any following bookmarklet code will not execute until the library is loaded (assuming the library was interpreted successfully - no syntax errors).

To prevent the files from being cached, you can append a meaningless query string...

url = 'jquery.js?x=' + new Date().getTime();
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Apparently, dynamically added javascript doesn't work exactly as you describe. The element is added by the addElement DOM function and immediately returns. onLoad helps, but I'm disturbed by this post: answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=595949 –  altCognito Apr 16 '09 at 14:51
    
Your comment is not accurate, specially when it comes to this question. altCognito described the problem, let me make it a bit clearer. If your script dynamically adds a script tag, the contents of the dynamic tag won't be parsed until you exit out of the current script tag –  Juan Mendes Dec 2 '10 at 23:59

I've paid an attention that in Chrome the order of scripts that are loaded is undetermined, when using @Vincent Robert's technique. In this case a little modification helps:


(function() {
    var callback = function() {
        // Do you work
    };
        // check for our library existence
    if (typeof (MyLib) == 'undefined') {
        var sources = [
                'http://ajax.cdnjs.com/ajax/libs/json2/20110223/json2.js',
            'https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.6.1/jquery.min.js',
            'https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jqueryui/1.8.13/jquery-ui.min.js',
            'http://myhost.com/javascripts/mylib.min.js'];

        var loadNextScript = function() {
            if (sources.length > 0) {
                var script = document.createElement('script');
                script.src = sources.shift();
                document.body.appendChild(script);

                var done = false;
                script.onload = script.onreadystatechange = function() {
                    if (!done
                            && (!this.readyState || this.readyState == "loaded" || this.readyState == "complete")) {
                        done = true;

                        // Handle memory leak in IE
                        script.onload = script.onreadystatechange = null;

                        loadNextScript();
                    }
                }
            } else {
                callback();
            }
        }
        loadNextScript();

    } else {
        callback();
    }
})();
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I got a little closer with this, but not completely. It would be nice to have a discrete, example of a bookmarklet that demonstrated how to avoided caching.

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