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We're using Ninject for IOC.

All of our Repository objects can (and should be) mocked for unit testing. I'd like to enforce that all developers code only to interfaces when interacting with Repositories. For this, I'd like to make the constructors private and create static accessor factory methods for construction:

public class SomeRepository : ISomeRepository
{
 private SomeRepository()
 {
 }
 public static ISomeRepository Create()
 {
   return StandardKernel.Get<ISomeRepository>();
 }
}

Problem lies in this: how do I have Ninject create the actual object? I have repository interface and class in the same project

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Obligatory Service Locator link. I would read this twice before proceeding with your design - StandardKernel.Get looks like a Service Locator from here. I won't say "Service Locator is definitely wrong here", but Mark Seemann would, and I would trust him over me if I were you. –  default.kramer Sep 27 '11 at 6:07
1  
Why do you want to enforce private constructors? No offense but I think you should trust your developers and simply define certain written or spoken convetions instead of overcomplicating things with an awkward design... –  Daniel Marbach Sep 27 '11 at 9:14
    
@default.kramer: completely agree with the article, which is why I want to not fall into the same trap. By having no other way of creating objects, I am planning to force maintenance developers to use IOC instead of direction instantiation –  Igorek Sep 27 '11 at 12:38
    
@DanielMarbach: we have a number of maintenance developers and even some feature developers who simply will take the shortest route to solving the problem, and "new someobject()" is the shortest route, instead of setting up a mapping between an interface and an object and later on using some weird syntax to instantiate. It's the reality :( –  Igorek Sep 27 '11 at 12:39
1  
I deleted my answer again as I wasn't happy with it. I went over some documentation regarding IoC, DI and Ninject and came to the conclusion to agree with Daniel Marbach regarding code reviews. the Ninject StandardKernel uses the rules provided during construction to determine the concrete instance and return a completed object to the calling method. Why let SomeRepository use the kernel? Isn't the idea of IoC for SomeRepository not to have to constrcut or load it's own dependencies? I agree code reviews is the way to go to ensure all developers use the kernel as required. –  François Wahl Sep 28 '11 at 12:39
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

We're ultimately going with the following:

public class SomeRepository : ISomeRepository
{
 private SomeRepository()
 {
 }
 public static ISomeRepository CreateForIOC()
 {
   return new SomeRepository();
 }
}

and during module loading, we're mapping the StandardKernel's ISomeRepository interface to CreateForIOC() method.

This does not stop developers from calling CreateForIOC directly, but at least forces them to a) code to an interface, b) realize that CreateForIOC() is probably not the right method to call when instantiating the object and at least ask a question about it from a lead developer

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Unless I missunderstood the reason for the static "constructor", you can use an inline func to construct the class when mapping the interface. Kernel.Bind<ISomeRepository>().ToMethod(concrete => { return new SomeRepository(); });. That would save you the hassle of having to have the static there. Your private constructor has to be gone eitherway as I think you cannot make a "new" instance of something that has a private constructor regadless if its a static method within the class or a func in the mappings. –  François Wahl Sep 30 '11 at 10:15
    
Static CreateForIOC method is in the class itself, so it has a direct access to the constructor, even if it is private. NInject would not be able to create an object with a private constructor only w/o a helper static method or some factory –  Igorek Sep 30 '11 at 23:23
1  
I didn't realize that, as I got a compile error on the Ninject call due to the hidden constructor so I thought it also would to that for the static method. I learned something new today, thank you. Regarding the implementation, I would still try and not have the class itself do the construction and just use Ninject methods instead to return the implementations, just my personal preference I guess. Hope you got that all sorted by now :) –  François Wahl Oct 1 '11 at 21:16
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Instead of either the private constructor or the factory method, why not just have Ninject provide the the concrete repository to any objects that need it?

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can you elaborate? –  Igorek Sep 27 '11 at 12:41
1  
If you place the respository types in the container, then get your application class instances that depend on the repositories from the container, Ninject will automatically provide the repository instance to the types that need it. This is commonly calles "auto wire-up" and is part of what makes DI/IoC containers worth learning and using, –  Eric Farr Sep 27 '11 at 12:46
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It looks like you're trying to use a singleton pattern. In general, the singleton pattern is considered an anti-pattern, largely because it hinders unit testing. Dependency injection allows you to create singletons via configuration without having to use the singleton pattern.

I would suggest that you instead, simply configure Ninject to create a single instance of your app without the private constructor.

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That's no Singleton... –  Austin Salonen Sep 27 '11 at 3:43
    
@AustinSalonen - I know, that's why I said "it looks like you're trying to...", the emphasis on "trying". –  Erik Funkenbusch Sep 27 '11 at 3:45
    
No attempt at doing singletons. I am simply trying to enforce coding to an interface by providing a factory method instead of allowing for creation of the object directly and thus allowing developers to code to object itself –  Igorek Sep 27 '11 at 12:40
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