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Please check this code..

class ex
{
     int i;
     public:
     ex(int ii = 0):i(ii){}
      ~ex(){cout<<"dest"<<endl;}
     void show()
     {
        cout<<"show fun called"<<endl;
     }
};
int main(int argc , char *argv[])
{
    ex *ob = NULL;
     ob->show();
       return 0;
}

what happens when we call show method.

Thanks..

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2  
The real answer to the question is no one can answer what exactly can happen. –  Mahesh Sep 27 '11 at 5:48
    
@Mahesh techinically saying it causes undefined behaviour is the answer. The fact that we don't know what that undefined behaviour is, is not important. In other words 'undefined behaviour' is exactly what will happen. –  sashang Sep 27 '11 at 5:52
    
Another question of many where either karthik or user692270 accepts @karthik 's answer. Seriously, do you suffer from an inferiority complex? –  phresnel Sep 27 '11 at 7:32
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
ex *ob = NULL;
ob->show();

You're dereferencing a null pointer which causes undefined behaviour. This is bad.

If it's not clear where the dereference is then understand that the -> operator translates to (*ob).show().

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lol this got a downvote - clowns must be out in force today. –  sashang Sep 27 '11 at 5:55
    
I did not downvote but your answer is not correct. The show() function could have been static: it does not use the implicit this pointer, so nothing bad will happen. Only when the function tries to access member variables, call a virtual member function of the object etc. then the null pointer will be dereferenced. –  TonJ Sep 27 '11 at 6:13
    
@TonJ: show() is not static, as can be seen in the class definition. –  DevSolar Sep 27 '11 at 8:08
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It is undefined behavior.

That being said, on most compilers, you will be able to call methods on null pointers as long as

1) they don't access members.

2) they are not virtual.

Most compilers will translate

ob->show()

into

call ob::show

which is a valid method present in the application space. Since you're not accessing members, there's no reason for a crash.

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Should mention that "being able to do this on most compilers" doesn't change the fact that it's still undefined behaviour, i.e. an error in the code. –  DevSolar Sep 27 '11 at 8:10
    
That's my first sentence... –  Luchian Grigore Sep 27 '11 at 8:10
1  
...but the rest gives the impression that it is somewhat okay-ish to do this, and that "there's no reason for a crash", which is IMHO the wrong message to give here. It's undefined behaviour, don't do it, period. –  DevSolar Sep 27 '11 at 8:12
1  
I'm merely saying it's undefined behavior and also explaining why it works. I think it's more useful than just saying "don't do it". I for one like knowing this kind of stuff. I wouldn't do it in a production environment, but for hacking at home, it can be fun to see what you can do. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 27 '11 at 8:18
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Calling the show method on the object pointed by a null pointer is classified as "Undefined Behavior" and it means that whatever happens you cannot tell that C++ is wrong because the mistake in on your side.

Undefined behavior means that the compiler writers do not need to care about the consequences of your bad programming... so they are free to just ignore those cases. Often undefined behavior is thought to mean "crash" but this is quite far from truth. Executing code with undefined behavior may crash, may do nothing, may apparently do nothing and make your program to crash one million instructions later in a perfectly fine place or it may even running apparently fine and without crashes at all but silently corrupting your data.

One main assumption of the C++ language is that the programmers make no mistake. In other languages this is not true and you get "runtime error angels" that will check and stop your program when you made a mistake... in C++ instead those checks are considered too expensive and therefore instead of "runtime error angels" you get "undefined behavior daemons" that in case of an error will have fun of you.

This, added to the high complexity of C++, is the reason for which I think that C++ is a very bad choice for beginners (beginners make a lot of mistakes) and make impossible to learn C++ by experimentation (because consequences of errors are non deterministic).

In your specific case, given that compiler writers are lazy (not a bad quality for a programmer) I'd guess that on x86 architectures the code wouldn't probably do any damage and it will probably execute as if the pointer was to a valid object. This is of course just speculation as it depends on the compiler, the hardware and the compiler options. Probably there are out there good compilers that have a compiling debug option that will generate code that crashes instead.

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The behaviour is undefined. How the program will actually behave is implementation-dependent. I expect that most implementations try to execute the code without checking the pointer. So your initial example should run smoothly since it does not reference any local member of the class.

It is interesting to check what the following code does:

class ex
{
    int i;
    public:
    ex(int ii = 0):i(ii){}
    ~ex(){cout<<"dest"<<endl;}
    virtual void show()
    {
        cout<<"show fun called"<<endl;
    }
};

int main(int argc , char *argv[])
{
    ex *ob = NULL;
    ob->show();
    return 0;
}

If the method is virtual maybe the runtime needs to access some local data of the object, leading to a null pointer or bad address exception.

EDIT

I tested the following slightly modified example with GCC on cygwin:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class ex
{
    int i;
    public:
    ex(int ii = 0):i(ii){}
    ~ex(){cout<<"dest"<<endl;}

    void show()
    {
        cout<<"show fun called"<<endl;
    }

    virtual void vshow()
    {
        cout<<"vshow fun called"<<endl;
    }
};

int main(int argc , char *argv[])
{
    ex *ob = NULL;
    ob->show();
    ob->vshow();
    return 0;
}

and, in fact, the output is:

show fun called
Segmentation fault (Core dumped)
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there's no such thing as a null pointer exception in c++ –  sashang Sep 27 '11 at 6:09
    
I did not mean that the exception is thrown by the C++ runtime itself, it is thrown by the operating system when you try to dereference the NULL pointer. The result is a program crash. –  Giorgio Sep 27 '11 at 9:49
    
what the operating system does when you reference invalid memory is operating system dependent. On linux a SIGSEGV signal (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SIGSEGV) is generated and sent to the program, not a null pointer exception. The original wording of your answer was misleading. –  sashang Sep 27 '11 at 10:33
    
I did not write that the program receives a null pointer exception. I wrote that the execution of the program leads to a null pointer exception, meaning an exception that is generated by the processor when it tries to dereference a null pointer. Normally the exception is handled by calling an operating system routine that, as you say, on Linux maps the exception to a signal that is sent to the process that caused the exception. (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Segmentation_fault) So the exception originates in the hardware and is mapped to a signal or some other mechanism by the OS. –  Giorgio Sep 27 '11 at 11:19
    
Regarding my first comment above, you are right, the exception is not thrown but received by the operating system. And "null pointer exception" is imprecise, "segmentation fault" is more precise, since the same kind of exception is thrown any time an invalid address is used (not only null). I thought, however, that this was not the point of the question (i.e. what kind of exception or signal originates where) but rather whether the program prints something or crashes. –  Giorgio Sep 27 '11 at 11:35
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