Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a base-class (let it be SomeBaseClass) containing a public event (SomeEvent) and I have a derived-class in which I want to raise this event but I can't(!!) VS 2010 says me (in derived-class in line: base.SomeEvent != null) "The event 'SomeBaseClass.SomeEvent' can only appear on the left hand side of += or -=". If I replace base on this It is make no sense.

share|improve this question
    
Can you show your event definition and how you set it? –  Davide Piras Sep 27 '11 at 6:12
    
public event EventHandler<StateChangedEventArgs> StateChanged; –  Praetor12 Sep 27 '11 at 6:16
add comment

3 Answers

No, it's absolutely right - the event is only an event (with subscription and unsubscription) as far as a derived class is concerned. If your base class wants to let derived classes raise the event, it should include a protected method to do so (typically a virtual OnFoo(EventHandler) for an event called Foo with the EventHandler type, for example). Note that if you write a field-like event in C# like this:

public event EventHandler Foo;

That's actually declaring a private field called Foo (which that class and any nested classes have access to) and a public event (which consists only of subscribe/unsubscribe). You could declare your own "custom" event like this:

protected EventHandler foo;
// Note: not thread-safe. Only present for demonstration purposes.
public event EventHandler Foo
{
    add { foo += value; }
    remove { foo -= value; }
}

and then derived classes would have access to the field... but I wouldn't recommend that. (I rarely declare non-private fields, other than for constants.)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Take a look at the following article.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You need to do it the right way (i.e., the idiomatic way in C#)

public class Base {
    public event EventHandler<EventArgs> SomeEvent;
    protected virtual void OnSomeEvent(EventArgs e) {
        EventHandler<EventArgs> handler = SomeEvent;
        if (handler != null) {
            handler(this, e);
        }
    }
}

public class Derived {
    protected virtual void OnSomeEvent(EventArgs e) {
        // derived event handling here
        // then invoke the base handler
        base.OnSomeEvent(e);
    }
}

The reason that you do it like this is because events can only be invoked from within the defining class.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.