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I have tried to print my array using a few different methods and seem to have screwed it all up. I used to get something back out of it and now I can only get zero's back out. If anybody knew a way to print the array, easily, that would be great. Using Array.toString doesn't seem to work for some reason.

    public class Array {
private long[] InitialArray;
private int size = 0;

/**
 * the default constructor
 */
public Array(int size){
    InitialArray = new long[size]; 
}

/**
 * this will scan in integers from a file
 * @param scans
 */
public Array(Scanner scans){
    this(1);
    int j = 0; //just used as a counter basically
    while(scans.hasNext()){ //grabs each element
        this.insert(Integer.parseInt(scans.nextLine())); //inserts it
        j++; //steps through using the counter
    }
}

/**
 * this will make the array longer if more space is needed so you don't
 * crash if you have a very large set of numbers
 */
public void stretch(){
    long[] temp = new long[InitialArray.length *2]; //makes a temp array double the normal size
    for(int i=0; i < InitialArray.length; i++)
        temp [i] = InitialArray[i]; //steps through the old array to keep the data
    InitialArray = temp; //assigns the temp array to the new array
}

/**
 * this will insert each element read, from a file, into the array
 * @param x
 */
public void insert(int x){
    if (this.size+1 == InitialArray.length){ //trying not to crash
        stretch(); //making sure I don't crash
    }
    InitialArray[size++] = x; //stepping through the numbers and inserting
    sorter();
}

/**
 * this is a selection sort on the array
 * It's not the quickest, but it's fairly easy to build and understand
 * Just finds the minimum element and swaps it to it's proper place
 * @return 
 */
public long[] sorter(){
    for (int i=0; i<InitialArray.length-1; i++){
        int minimum = i; //assigning a minimum
        for (int j=i+1; j<InitialArray.length; j++){
            if (InitialArray[minimum] > InitialArray[j]) { //checking to make sure it is the smallest
                minimum = j; //if it isn't then do this
            }
        }
        if (minimum != i){ //all the swapping stuff, which I never really understand but it works
            long temp = InitialArray[i];
            InitialArray[i] = InitialArray[minimum];
            InitialArray[minimum]= temp;
        }
    }
    return InitialArray;
}
/**
* @param args
  */
public static void main(String[] args) {
Scanner scans;
try {
    scans = new Scanner(new FileInputStream("src/some numbers.txt"));
    Array InitialArray = new Array(scans);
    System.out.println(InitialArray);
} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
    e.printStackTrace();
}
}
}

I kept getting an error saying it has to be an array type but resolved to Array. I just need it to see if anything else is even working.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Answer to what's actually going on is below the rule. Presumably this is only code for learning about Java - as otherwise the ArrayList class would be more suitable. You should try to use this as an exercise in debugging... what would help you to work out what was going wrong (e.g. logging, stepping through with a debugger)? How can you tackle one problem at a time? How could you unit test the code? That way you'll learn more than just what was wrong with your specific code.


You haven't overridden toString in the Array class. If you add this method:

@Override public String toString() {
    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
        if (i > 0) {
            builder.append(" ");
        }
        builder.append(InitialArray[i]);
    }
    return builder.toString();
}

then it prints values. It doesn't quite print the values you were expecting, due to the sorter method, but that's a separate problem.

Currently your sorter() method - which may or may not actually be sorting correctly, I haven't checked - sorts the whole of the array, not just up to size. That means you end up sorting your "valid" values into the "invalid" part of the array which you then overwrite later.

If you just change your limits to use size instead of InitialArray.length it seems to work - but as I say, I haven't checked the sorting itself.

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Thanks, You are right about my sort not working right. This is more for just trying to learn a few things. I can try to change it over to an ArrayList, then I wouldn't have to worry about the size of it and can get rid of my whole stretch and everything. I'll try to do that. –  Defc0n Sep 28 '11 at 5:54

Use java.util.Arrays.toString(long[]) method and also overrider toString() method in your Array class.

I've made correction in sorter() method to make sure that only "valid" elements are should be arranged.

public class Array
{
 public long[] sorter()
 {
   for (int i=0; i<size; i++)
    {
    int minimum = i; 
    for (int j=i+1; j<size; j++)
     {
      if (InitialArray[minimum] > InitialArray[j]) 
        { 
          minimum = j; //if it isn't then do this
        }
      }
    if (minimum != i)
     { 
       long temp = InitialArray[i];
       InitialArray[i] = InitialArray[minimum];
       InitialArray[minimum]= temp;
      }
    }
    return InitialArray;
 }

 @Override 
 public String toString() 
  {
     return java.util.Arrays
       .toString(java.util.Arrays.copyOf(InitialArray,size));
  }
}
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That was my first instinct too, but it ignores the size variable determining how many values are "valid". –  Jon Skeet Sep 27 '11 at 6:54
    
That's true. the sorter() mixed up valid and invalid "part" of array. –  AVD Sep 27 '11 at 7:37
    
But even aside from that, you end up with a bunch of 0s at the end which aren't part of the logical contents. –  Jon Skeet Sep 27 '11 at 8:09
    
@JonSkeet Sorry I was offline. Thank you Sir for pointing out that and I appreciate your help. –  AVD Sep 27 '11 at 10:36

I don't see your Arrays class implement a toString() method. You should override the toString() method in your class and in the implementation print the state that you wish to see.

In this particular example, I assume it would be printing the array of long values. Arrays.toString(long[] array) should help you with that.

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