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I'm designing a UI manager class that will manage all my UI elements (this is for an XNA game, so there is no existing UI framework) but I'm wondering how to deal with situations where I want the UI manager to have special access to data in the UI elements that other classes can't access.

For example, I want to have a SetFocus method to focus a specific element and this method needs to ensure that the previously focused element loses focus. The individual UI elements themselves can't handle this because they don't have access to the list of UI elements, which means the manager has to handle it, but how can I allow the manager and only the manager to set the variable on a UI element?

The thought occurs to me to just store the currently focused element on the manager, however I don't particularly like that solution and, given a single UI element, I would like to query it to find out if it has focus. Even if it makes sense to store the currently focused element on the manager since its just a single variable, there are other things I need to deal with that would require arrays to associate the data with the elements if its stored on the manager, and that just seems to defeat the purpose of OOP.

I know I don't need to have it so that the manager is the only one with access to this data, I could just make all the data public, but that's not good design...

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I know I don't need to have it so that the manager is the only one with access to this data, I could just make all the data public, but that's not good design... actually that would be a better design, as the two components would not be so tightly coupled to eachother... –  MattDavey Sep 27 '11 at 9:37
    
I think in this case, it's a good idea for these 2 classes to be tightly coupled. The manager is designed specifically for the UI elements –  Telanor Sep 27 '11 at 22:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you are looking for is a C# equivalent of the C++ friend concept. As you read in the linked post 'the closest that's available (and it isn't very close) is InternalsVisibleTo' (citing Jon Skeet). But using InternalsVisibleTo in order to accomplish what you want would mean you'd have to break up your complete application into a library per class, which would probably create a DLL hell.

Building upon MattDavey's example got me:

interface IFocusChecker
{
    bool HasFocus(Control control);
}

class Manager : IFocusChecker
{
    private Control _focusedControl;

    public void SetFocus(Control control)
    {            
        _focusedControl = control;
    }

    public bool HasFocus(Control control)
    {
        return _focusedControl == control;
    }
}

class Control
{
    private IFocusChecker _checker;

    public Control(IFocusChecker checker)
    {
        _checker = checker;
    }

    public bool HasFocus()
    {
        return _checker.HasFocus(this);
    }
}

Whether a Control has focus is now only stored in the Manager and only the Manager can change the focused Control.

A little example how to put things together, for completeness:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Manager manager = new Manager();
        Control firstControl = new Control(manager);
        Control secondControl = new Control(manager);

        // No focus set yet.
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("firstControl has focus? {0}",
            firstControl.HasFocus()));
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("secondControl has focus? {0}",
            secondControl.HasFocus()));

        // Focus set to firstControl.
        manager.SetFocus(firstControl);

        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("firstControl has focus? {0}",
            firstControl.HasFocus()));
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("secondControl has focus? {0}",
            secondControl.HasFocus()));

        // Focus set to firstControl.
        manager.SetFocus(secondControl);

        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("firstControl has focus? {0}",
            firstControl.HasFocus()));
        Console.WriteLine(string.Format("secondControl has focus? {0}",
            secondControl.HasFocus()));
    }
}
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Interesting. The c++ friend concept would have been exactly what I needed, but your solution of passing the manager to the control so they can communicate will work. I might go with a factory pattern in that case so I don't have to pass the manager around left and right. –  Telanor Sep 27 '11 at 9:19

Having a variable on a control itself which is implicitly relative to the state of other controls is probably a poor design decision. The concept of "focus" is of concern at a much higher level, either a window or better yet, a user (the user is the one doing the focusing). So it's at the window or user level that a reference to the focused control should be stored, but in addition to that, there ought to be a way for controls to be notified when they gain/lose focus from the user - this could be done via events on the user/manager or by any standard notification pattern.

class Control
{
    public Boolean HasFocus { get; private set; }

    internal void NotifyGainedFocus()
    {
        this.HasFocus = true;
        this.DrawWithNiceBlueShininess = true;
    }

    internal void NotifyLostFocus()
    {
        this.HasFocus = false;
        this.DrawWithNiceBlueShininess = false;
    }
}

class User // or UIManager
{
    public Control FocusedControl { get; private set; }

    public void SetFocusOn(Control control)
    {
        if (control != this.FocusedControl)
        {
            if (this.FocusedControl != null)
                this.FocusedControl.NotifyLostFocus();

            this.FocusedControl = control;

            this.FocusedControl.NotifyGainedFocus();
        }
    }
}

Disclaimer: I've never written a UI library and I may be talking complete nonsense..

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I suppose when you put it that way it does make sense for the manager to keep track of that. The problem with your example though is that it ends up in the same situation: any class can just call NotifyGainedFocus and mess things up. Since all my code is in the same assembly, internal is the same as public in this case (correct me if I'm wrong, I've never used internal). Again, I know its not a huge problem, but the purpose of my question is to find if there is a nicer way to do this –  Telanor Sep 27 '11 at 8:34
    
Try to think of the components in isolation - a control has a certain interface, it shouldn't know or care who consumes it. Once you start thinking in terms of "only this object should be able to do this to that object" you're creating a very tightly coupled design which is going to be near impossible to test. –  MattDavey Sep 27 '11 at 9:18

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