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I have a database table as follows:

couldn't be bothered with an image description, I guess

This returns all column titles in the pic, but the one's that are most important are slug, and parent (not sure about id_button).

The array gets ordered automatically by id_button ASC, which really irks me. But, anyways, this is not important, as I need to order it completely different, or re-order it after the array is populated.

The array returns this, by order of id_button:

$new_menu_buttons = array(
    0 => array(
            'id_button' => 1,
            'parent' => 'help',
            'position' => 'child_of',
            'slug' => 'testing',
    ),
    1 => array(
            'id_button' => 2,
            'parent' => 'packages',
            'position' => 'after',
            'slug' => 'sub_test_1',
    ),
    2 => array(
            'id_button' => 3,
            'parent' => 'google.com',
            'position' => 'after',
            'slug' => 'another_test',
    ),
    3 => array(
            'id_button' => 4,
            'parent' => 'testing'
            'position' => 'child_of',
            'slug' => 'google.com',
    )
);

I need to order it so that if a slug is found within any parent, than the slug that is in the parent needs to be loaded before the one that has it defined within the parent.

Its not important if it is directly before it. For example, you see testing is the first slug that gets returned, and yet the parent for this is the last slug (google.com). So as long as the slug row where the parent is defined gets ordered so that it is BEFORE the row that has the slug value in the parent column, everything is fine.

So in this situation, it can be reordered as any of these 3 ordered arrays below:

$new_menu_buttons = array(
    0 => array(
            'id_button' => 1,
            'parent' => 'help',
            'position' => 'child_of',
            'slug' => 'testing',
    ),
    1 => array(
            'id_button' => 2,
            'parent' => 'packages',
            'position' => 'after',
            'slug' => 'sub_test_1',
    ),
    2 => array(
            'id_button' => 4,
            'parent' => 'testing',
            'position' => 'child_of',
            'slug' => 'google.com',
    ),
    3 => array(
            'id_button' => 3,
            'parent' => 'google.com'
            'position' => 'after',
            'slug' => 'another_test',
    )
);

OR this...

$new_menu_buttons = array(
    0 => array(
            'id_button' => 1,
            'parent' => 'help',
            'position' => 'child_of',
            'slug' => 'testing',
    ),
    1 => array(
            'id_button' => 4,
            'parent' => 'testing',
            'position' => 'child_of',
            'slug' => 'google.com',
    ),
    2 => array(
            'id_button' => 2,
            'parent' => 'packages',
            'position' => 'after',
            'slug' => 'sub_test_1',
    ),
    3 => array(
            'id_button' => 3,
            'parent' => 'google.com'
            'position' => 'after',
            'slug' => 'another_test',
    )
);

OR even this...

$new_menu_buttons = array(
    0 => array(
            'id_button' => 1,
            'parent' => 'help',
            'position' => 'child_of',
            'slug' => 'testing',
    ),
    1 => array(
            'id_button' => 4,
            'parent' => 'testing',
            'position' => 'child_of',
            'slug' => 'google.com',
    ),
    2 => array(
            'id_button' => 3,
            'parent' => 'google.com'
            'position' => 'after',
            'slug' => 'another_test',
    ),
    3 => array(
            'id_button' => 2,
            'parent' => 'packages',
            'position' => 'after',
            'slug' => 'sub_test_1',
    )
);

All 3 of these ordered arrays will work because the array with the slug that matches the parent is before the array with the matching parent, and since the slug value, sub_test_1 doesn't match any of the parent values this array order is unimportant, so that array can be located anywhere within the array.

How can I do this? I'm thinking of just looping through the array somehow and trying to determine if the slug is in any of the parents, and just do a reordering somehow...

In short, the slug needs to be ordered before the parent ONLY if there is a parent that matches a slug within the array. Otherwise, if no match is found, the order isn't important.

share|improve this question
    
Usually the best way to solve this is to leave the ordering to the database, if possible. –  Niko Sep 27 '11 at 7:35
    
And how can this be done via the database? Because the database query is not ordering anything at the moment, however, it still returns the array in ascending order using id_button. –  SoLoGHoST Sep 27 '11 at 7:36
    
How do you get the data from there? –  Niko Sep 27 '11 at 7:37
    
Also, I was told that if you are grabbing the entire contents of a table, than you should use ORDER BY NULL so that there aren't any memory problems. So I'm using this order for the table. –  SoLoGHoST Sep 27 '11 at 7:39
    
Well, it doesn't have to return the same array with the new order. It can return a different array with the new order also. Cause I'll need to pass the ordered array into a function, so it's not a problem if the ordered array is a different name. –  SoLoGHoST Sep 27 '11 at 7:44

4 Answers 4

As Niko suggested, databases support powerful sorting functionality, so you normally can best solve this by telling the database in which order to return the data. If the data is queried with SQL, that's the ORDER BY clause. This is specified in the documentation of your database, assuming you're using MySQL 5.0: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/sorting-rows.html

If you can not influence the order on the database level, you're in the need to sort the array in PHP. You actually have an array of arrays, in which the outer array is just a list having the id (primary key) of each row and the other fields as a fieldname -> value array as a value (inner array).

Your sort is *user-defined` - you specify the sort order. A common way is to have a sort function that compares two entries which each other. That sort function needs to decide which of those two is of a higher sort-order than the other (or both have the same weight). In you case one item is higher than the other if one is the child of the other.

That's the general principle. You define the sort function that decides (the so called callback function), and PHP takes care to feed it with the array data to sort with the usortDocs function.

A sub-problem you need to solve then is to decide whether or not a child exists in the whole array (an item with a slug having the same value as parent). As this all looks like it can be a bit more complex, it's wise to encapsulate this all into a class of it's own.

Example / Demo:

class menuButtons
{
    /**
     * @var array
     */
    private $buttons;

    public function __construct(array $buttons)
    {
        $this->buttons = $buttons;
    }


    public function sortChildsFirst()
    {
        $buttons = $this->buttons;
        usort($buttons, array($this, 'sortCallback'));
        return $buttons;
    }

    private function sortCallback($a, $b)
    {
        // an element is more than any other if it's parent
        // value is any other slugs value

        if ($this->slugExists($a['parent']))
            return 1;

        return -1;
    }

    private function slugExists($slug)
    {
        foreach($this->buttons as $button)
        {
            if ($button['slug'] === $slug)
                return true;
        }
        return false;
    }
}

$buttons = new menuButtons($new_menu_buttons);

$order = $buttons->sortChildsFirst();

Note: This code is exploiting the fact that your sort order is only roughly specified. You only wrote that you need to have children before parents, so if you take all children first, this will always be the case. It's not that each parent will directly follow the child.

Nevertheless, this skeleton class can work as a base to further improve the search functionality as it's fully encapsulated. You can even change the whole sort method, e.g. to completely write one of your own even w/o usort, like outlined below. The main code does not need to change as it's only making use of the sortChildsFirst method.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry, looking at your DEMO Example of this and this returns the EXACT same order of the array. How does this help me any??? –  SoLoGHoST Sep 28 '11 at 4:36
    
@SoLoGHoST: You wrote that the child must come earlier than the parten, that sort order is obtained. If this is not what you wanted, you need to change the search functionality, e.g. with what stereofrog outlined. Additionally you can more precisely describe in your question what the sort order actually is, the wording you use is pretty ambiguously and from the example data it's not really crystal clear either what the criteria is. –  hakre Sep 28 '11 at 8:35
    
If a value in the parent column is found that matches any of the values in the slugs column, than the row with the slug in it needs to come before the row with the parent of that slug. Your example returns the same exact array which doesn't make any sense at all, because nothing is being ordered any different from the original array. –  SoLoGHoST Sep 28 '11 at 9:06
    
BTW, added this to my question, but will comment it also... Its not important if it is directly before it. For example, you see testing is the first slug that gets returned, and yet the parent for this is the last slug (google.com). So as long as the slug row where the parent is defined gets ordered so that it is BEFORE the row that has the slug value in the parent column, everything is fine. –  SoLoGHoST Sep 28 '11 at 9:13
    
In short, the slug needs to be ordered before the parent ONLY if there is a parent that matches a slug within the array. Otherwise, if no match is found, the order isn't important. –  SoLoGHoST Sep 28 '11 at 9:26

You can sort an array once populated using the usort() function.

http://php.net/manual/en/function.usort.php

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't usort remove all key values of an array? I'm thinking usort resets the array indexes, and not sure if that is what I want to do. Probably best for the first index, but not all that follow... Can you give me an example of using this function for my purpose btw? Thanks :) –  SoLoGHoST Sep 27 '11 at 8:07
    
Would you mind to provide an example how to do that with a usort callback and the data / sort-order specified? I don't think it's that trivial as you outline it in your answer (is it even possible?). –  hakre Sep 27 '11 at 8:16
    
There is a similar function which preserves indexes: uasort php.net/manual/en/function.uasort.php –  elitalon Sep 27 '11 at 8:33
    
Hey thanks, but I don't think I need this at all. See my answer below. Cheers :) –  SoLoGHoST Sep 27 '11 at 10:38

Since your structure is tree-alike, the first thing that comes to mind is to build a tree out of it. It goes like this:

$tree = array();

foreach($array as $e) {
    $p = $e['parent'];
    $s = $e['slug'];
    if(!isset($tree[$p]))
        $tree[$p] = new stdclass;
    if(!isset($tree[$s]))
        $tree[$s] = new stdclass;
    $tree[$s]->data = $e;
    $tree[$p]->sub[] = $tree[$s];
}

This creates a set of objects, with the members data and sub = list of child objects. Now we iterate the tree and for each "root" node, add it and its children to the sorted array:

$out = array();

foreach($tree as $node)
    if(!isset($tree[$node->data['parent']]))
        add($out, $node);

where add() is

function add(&$out, $node) {
    if(isset($node->data))
        $out[] = $node->data;
    if(isset($node->sub))
        foreach($node->sub as $n)
            add($out, $n);
}

hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
up vote -1 down vote accepted

Ok, first let me thank you all for your detailed explanations. They are very intuitive. However, I found another way, can you guys let me know if you spot anything wrong with this method here please?

Click here to see a Demo of this working!

$temp_buttons = array();
foreach($new_menu_buttons as $buttons)
    $temp_buttons[$buttons['parent']] = $buttons['slug'];


dp_sortArray($new_menu_buttons, $temp_buttons, 'slug');

// The $new_menu_buttons array is now sorted correctly!  Let's check it...
var_dump($new_menu_buttons);

function dp_sortArray(&$new_menu_buttons, $sortArray, $sort)
{
    $new_array = array();
    $temp = array();
    foreach ($new_menu_buttons as $key => $menuitem)
    {
        if (isset($sortArray[$menuitem[$sort]]))
        {
            $new_array[] = $menuitem;

            $temp[$menuitem['parent']] = $menuitem['slug'];
            unset($new_menu_buttons[$key]);
        }   
    }

    $ordered = array();

    if (!empty($new_array))
    {
        foreach ($new_array as $key => $menuitem)
        {
            if (isset($temp[$menuitem[$sort]]))
            {
                $ordered[] = $menuitem;
                unset($new_array[$key]);
            }
        }
    }
    else
    {
        $new_menu_buttons = $new_menu_buttons;
        return;
    }

    $new_menu_buttons = array_merge($ordered, $new_array, $new_menu_buttons);
}

Seems to work in all instances that I tested, but ofcourse, their could be a flaw in it somewhere. What do you all think of this?

share|improve this answer
    
This method works flawlessly. Not 1 problem with it at all! –  SoLoGHoST Sep 30 '11 at 4:04
    
Why a -1 here? What's wrong with this approach guys? –  SoLoGHoST Oct 11 '11 at 22:37

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