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I am having trouble coming up with a regular expression which would essentially black list certain special characters.

I need to use this to validate data in input fields (in a Java Web app). We want to allow users to enter any digit, letter (we need to include accented characters, ex. french or german) and some special characters such as '-. etc.

How do I blacklist characters such as <>%$ etc?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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3  
I'll put this in a comment since it isn't a complete solution, but only a suggestion. You are going to be much better off white-listing characters than blacklisting them since there are likely to be far fewer characters you want to allow than deny. –  JohnFx Apr 16 '09 at 15:07
    
Check my updated answer for using unicode ranges, perhaps that would simplify the whitelist issue? –  Jason Coyne Apr 16 '09 at 15:34
    
In the blacklist mode, japanse, chinese, korean etc will all be allowed. Is this acceptable? –  Jason Coyne Apr 16 '09 at 17:25
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8 Answers

I would just white list the characters.

^[a-zA-Z0-9äöüÄÖÜ]*$

Building a black list is equally simple with regex but you might need to add much more characters - there are a lot of Chinese symbols in unicode ... ;)

^[^<>%$]*$

The expression [^(many characters here)] just matches any character that is not listed.

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Your whitelist pattern does only include the German umlaut, but no French or other characters - and there are many common ones... like: ñëÿêâôîíì etc. therefore, basically only using a Unicode character group makes whitelisting possible with the requirement given. –  Lucero Apr 16 '09 at 15:19
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Of course ... only an example and the Umlaute were easiest to type on a German keyboard. –  Daniel Brückner Apr 16 '09 at 15:51
    
You didn't get the point I was trying to make. It's not about your choice of characters as sample, but about not really being able to whitelist all possible combinations. –  Lucero Apr 16 '09 at 16:15
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@Atomiton, Vietnamese (for example) has 11 vowel nuclei, each of which can have one of 5 accents (ex: ệ) as well as the letter đ. Polish has Ł Ź Ś Ę... Turkish has the dotted I, İ. There are hundreds of different accented letters. –  Jacob Krall Sep 30 '09 at 17:03
2  
There are a few hundred he wants to include but there are several thousands he wants to exclude. –  Daniel Brückner Sep 30 '09 at 18:11
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Its usually better to whitelist characters you allow, rather than to blacklist characters you don't allow. both from a security standpoint, and from an ease of implementation standpoint.

If you do go down the blacklist route, here is an example, but be warned, the syntax is not simple.

http://groups.google.com/group/regex/browse_thread/thread/0795c1b958561a07

If you want to whitelist all the accent characters, perhaps using unicode ranges would help? Check out this link.

http://www.regular-expressions.info/unicode.html

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Thanks for your reply. We tried whitelisting first but it is not practical since we want to allow any accented characters. We started with this: ^[a-zA-Z0-9. '-]+$ then we had to add all the French characters manually. Now we need all the German ones and so on. –  Ana Apr 16 '09 at 15:15
    
Have a look on my pattern, it whitelists all characters including all accented ones. –  Lucero Apr 16 '09 at 15:20
    
According to Gaijin's link, Lucero's pattern is too simplistic; check out the section labeled "Unicode Character Properties". (You need something like "\p{L}\p{M}*" to really catch all accented characters.) But I'm quite certain a whitelist is the way to go; a fully-populated blacklist will hurt. –  BlairHippo Apr 16 '09 at 15:56
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To exclude certain characters ( <, >, %, and $), you can make a regular expression like this:

[<>%\$]

This regular expression will match all inputs that have a blacklisted character in them. The brackets define a character class, and the \ is necessary before the dollar sign because dollar sign has a special meaning in regular expressions.

To add more characters to the black list, just insert them between the brackets; order does not matter.

According to some Java documentation for regular expressions, you could use the expression like this:

Pattern p = Pattern.compile("[<>%\$]");
Matcher m = p.matcher(unsafeInputString);
if (m.matches())
{
    // Invalid input: reject it, or remove/change the offending characters.
}
else
{
    // Valid input.
}
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matches() returns true iff the regex matches the whole string, as if it were anchored at both ends with '^' and '$'; you would need to use find() for this approach to work. But see the other answers for why a blacklist is bad idea. –  Alan Moore Apr 16 '09 at 22:18
    
Also, most metacharacters lose their special meanings when they're in a character class, so there's no need to escape the '$'. But if you did need to escape it you would have to use two backslashes ("\\$") because it's in a Java String literal. –  Alan Moore Apr 16 '09 at 22:22
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I guess it depends what language you are targeting. In general, something like this should work:

[^<>%$]

The "[]" construct defines a character class, which will match any of the listed characters. Putting "^" as the first character negates the match, ie: any character OTHER than one of those listed.

You may need to escape some of the characters within the "[]", depending on what language/regex engine you are using.

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Do you really want to blacklist specific characters or rather whitelist the allowed charachters?

I assume that you actually want the latter. This is pretty simple (add any additional symbols to whitelist into the [\-] group):

^(?:\p{L}\p{M}*|[\-])*$

Edit: Optimized the pattern with the input from the comments

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This is the right idea, but I don't think the capture group is needed, or in the right place. Wouldn't "[-\p{L}]*", used with the matches() method, do just fine? –  erickson Apr 16 '09 at 15:34
    
Yes it should. However, I wasn't sure how the Java Regex engine handles [-\p{L}] exactly; I'd at least escape the - character. Or you can make a non-capturing group (which makes the reges a little less easy to read): ^(?:\p{L}|[\-])*$ –  Lucero Apr 16 '09 at 15:51
    
See the second of Gaijin's two links, under "Unicode Character Properties" -- this might not catch everything it needs to, depending on how the character is encoded. (That page suggests "\p{L}\p{M}*".) But it definitely feels like it's close to being the solution. –  BlairHippo Apr 16 '09 at 16:06
    
This depends mainly whether the string is normalized or not, but yes, this is a valid point. –  Lucero Apr 16 '09 at 16:11
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Why do you consider regex the best tool for this? If your purpose is to detect whether an illegal character is present in a string, testing each character in a loop will be both simpler and more efficient than constructing a regex.

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Here's all the french accented characters: àÀâÂäÄáÁéÉèÈêÊëËìÌîÎïÏòÒôÔöÖùÙûÛüÜçÇ’ñ

I would google a list of German accented characters. There aren't THAT many. You should be able to get them all.

For URLS I Replace accented URLs with regular letters like so:

string beforeConversion = "àÀâÂäÄáÁéÉèÈêÊëËìÌîÎïÏòÒôÔöÖùÙûÛüÜçÇ’ñ";
string afterConversion = "aAaAaAaAeEeEeEeEiIiIiIoOoOoOuUuUuUcC'n";
for (int i = 0; i < beforeConversion.Length; i++) {

     cleaned = Regex.Replace(cleaned, beforeConversion[i].ToString(), afterConversion[i].ToString());
}

There's probably a more efficient way, mind you.

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I strongly suspect it's going to be easier to come up with a list of the characters that ARE allowed vs. the ones that aren't -- and once you have that list, the regex syntax becomes quite straightforward. So put me down as another vote for "whitelist".

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