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In SQL Server for CURSOR we say:

CREATE PROCEDURE SP_MY_PROC
                (@BANKID VARCHAR(6)='')
-------------------------------
-------------------------------

  DECLARE MY_CURSOR CURSOR FOR
    SELECT .......

Now, what I wonder, can we determine the select statement according to a cerain condition?

IF BANKID<>''// SELECT * FROM EMPLOYESS WHERE BANKID=@BANKID to be the cursors query
ELSE  // otherwise SELECT * FROM EMPLOYEES  to be the cursors query   

Or does it have to be static?

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1  
Please give condition details. which type of condition you want to add ? –  Upendra Chaudhari Sep 27 '11 at 7:50
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, you can do this with Dynamic SQL

IF @BANKID<> ''
    SET @sql = '
       DECLARE MyCursor CURSOR FOR
          SELECT ...'
ELSE
    SET @sql = '
       DECLARE MyCursor CURSOR FOR
          SELECT ...'

EXEC sp_executesql @sql 
OPEN MyCursor
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But isn't SQL Server going to complain as it does not know of MyCursor. MyCursor is inside a string. –  Mike JM Sep 27 '11 at 8:14
    
@Mikayil - you could declare it as a global cursor - that would be in scope until your connection closes. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 27 '11 at 8:20
    
I actually did not declare it as a global variable but it dod not complain. Commands completed succesfully. –  Mike JM Sep 27 '11 at 8:30
    
@Mikayil - Yes, you don't need to declare it as a global cursor. –  The Mouth of a Cow Sep 27 '11 at 8:45
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If it is such a simple example, it's better to re-write it as a single query:

DECLARE MY_CURSOR CURSOR FOR
    SELECT * FROM EMPLOYESS WHERE BANKID=@BANKID or @BANKID=''

And, of course, we haven't addressed whether a cursor is the right solution for the larger problem or not (cursors are frequently misused by people not used to thinking of set based solutions, which is what SQL is good at).


PS - avoid prefixing your stored procedures with sp_ - These names are "reserved" for SQL Server, and should be avoided to prevent future incompatibilities (and ignoring, for now, that it's also slower to access stored procs with such names, since SQL Server searches the master database before searching in the current database).

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I know , but the queries are absolutely different. I just wrote it as an example for @Upendra Chaudhari. I need to use cursor because I will check for a column value and perform an action according to that value for each record. –  Mike JM Sep 27 '11 at 8:16
1  
@Mikayil - it's rare to find a combination where two queries are entirely different, but whatever is consuming the results of those queries can consume either result set, without the queries being closely enough related to merge into a single one. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 27 '11 at 8:21
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever - It may be rare in database application development, but there is a lot of database work that is ad hoc or administrative and in this case it might quite useful. I think people totally forget this when their first response to a DB related question is "you don't want to do that because you shouldn't be doing it like that in a database". –  The Mouth of a Cow Sep 27 '11 at 8:51
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