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It seems that NHibernate does not pool ADO.NET database connections. Connections are only closed when the transaction is committed or rolled back. A review of the source code shows that there is no way to configure NHibernate so that it is closing connections when the ISession is disposed.

What was the intent of this behaviour? ADO.NET has connection pooling itself. There's no need to hold them open all the time within the transaction. With this behaviour are also unneccessaryly distributed transactions created. A possible workaround described in http://davybrion.com/blog/2010/05/avoiding-leaking-connections-with-nhibernate-and-transactionscope/ therefore does not work (at least not with NHibernate 3.1.0). I am using Informix. The same problem seems to exisit for every other database (http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6686993/nhibernate-connection-pooling).

Is there any other workaround or advice avoiding this problem?

Here's a unit test reproducing the problem:

  [Test]
  public void DoesNotCloseConnection()
  {
     using (SessionFactoryCache sessionFactoryCache = new SessionFactoryCache())
     {
        using (TransactionScope scope = new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeOption.Required, new TransactionOptions() { IsolationLevel = IsolationLevel.ReadCommitted, Timeout = TimeSpan.FromMinutes(10) }))
        {
           fixture.Setup(); // Creates test data

           System.Data.IDbConnection connectionOne;
           System.Data.IDbConnection connectionTwo;

           using (ISessionFactory sessionFactory = sessionFactoryCache.CreateFactory(GetType(), new TestNHibernateConfigurator()))
           {
              using (ISession session = sessionFactory.OpenSession())
              {
                 var result = session.QueryOver<Library>().List<Library>();
                 connectionOne = session.Connection;
              }
           }

           // At this point the first IDbConnection used internally by NHibernate should be closed

           using (ISessionFactory sessionFactory = sessionFactoryCache.CreateFactory(GetType(), new TestNHibernateConfigurator()))
           {
              using (ISession session = sessionFactory.OpenSession())
              {
                 var result = session.QueryOver<Library>().List<Library>();
                 connectionTwo = session.Connection;
              }
           }

           // At this point the second IDbConnection used internally by NHibernate should be closed

           // Now two connections are open because the transaction is still running
           Assert.That(connectionOne.State, Is.EqualTo(System.Data.ConnectionState.Closed)); // Fails because State is still 'Open'
           Assert.That(connectionTwo.State, Is.EqualTo(System.Data.ConnectionState.Closed)); // Fails because State is still 'Open'
        }
     }
  }

The disposing of the NHibernate-Session does nothing since we are still in a transaction

SessionImpl.cs:

public void Dispose()
    {
        using (new SessionIdLoggingContext(SessionId))
        {
            log.Debug(string.Format("[session-id={0}] running ISession.Dispose()", SessionId));
            if (TransactionContext!=null)
            {
                TransactionContext.ShouldCloseSessionOnDistributedTransactionCompleted = true;
                return;
            }
            Dispose(true);
        }
    }

Injecting a custom ConnectionProvider will also not work since the ConnectionManager calling the ConnectionProvider has several preconditions checking that closing a connection within a transaction is not allowed.

ConnectionManager.cs:

public IDbConnection Disconnect() {
        if (IsInActiveTransaction)
            throw  new InvalidOperationException("Disconnect cannot be called while a transaction is in progress.");

        try
        {
            if (!ownConnection)
            {
                return DisconnectSuppliedConnection();
            }
            else
            {
                DisconnectOwnConnection();
                ownConnection = false;
                return null;
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            // Ensure that AfterTransactionCompletion gets called since
            // it takes care of the locks and cache.
            if (!IsInActiveTransaction)
            {
                // We don't know the state of the transaction
                session.AfterTransactionCompletion(false, null);
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
As far as I know, databases need the same connection in order to utilize a transaction. So I don't find it strange that it keeps a connection alive as long as a transaction is running? If the connection is returned to the pool, there is nothing that ensure that you will receive the same connection from the pool the second time. –  jishi Sep 27 '11 at 11:45
    
However, in your concrete test, you are checking the underlying IdbConnection, which I assume is part of ADO.NET, and isn't it the ADO.NET connection pooling that you are testing in that case? What you should do is create two different sessions (from the same factory as well, make sure that is the case) and make sure that you receive the same connection. –  jishi Sep 27 '11 at 11:52
    
At the begin of each transaction the Driver class (in my case OdbcDriver) creates a new DbConnection (OdbcConnection). This connection stays open the whole transaction which is unnecessary. The test I've written actually uses two different sessions from one SessionFactory. –  Antineutrino Sep 27 '11 at 12:35
    
I'm still not sure that checking .State is fair test to make. Looking at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… it says: "Calling the State property on an open connection increases application overhead because each such call causes a SQL_ATTR_CONNECTION_DEAD call to the underlying ODBC driver to determine whether the connection is still valid." This indicates that a "Closed" connection might be a dead connection, therefor not reusable to the pool. –  jishi Sep 27 '11 at 13:02
    
furthermore: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… says the following: "Indicates the state of the SqlConnection when the most recent network operation was performed on the connection." Which leads me to think that the State doesn't actually represent what the current state of the connection is in this case, and can not be used to make sure connections are available to the pool. And pooling can also be a driver feature, I know for a fact that Npgsql has built in connection pooling, and doesn't rely on ADO.NET for it. –  jishi Sep 27 '11 at 13:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

NHibernate has two "modes".

  • Either you open the connection in your application, then it is up to the application to manage it. This "mode" is used when passing a connection to sessionfactory.OpenSession(connection).
  • Or the connection is created by NH. Then it is closed when the session is closed. This "mode" is used when not passing a connection to sessionfactory.OpenSession()

There is some support for TransactionScope. It is most probably using the first "mode". Probably the connection is not hold by NH, but by the transaction scope. I don't know exactly, I don't use environment transactions.

NH is using the ADO.NET connection pool by the way.

You can also disconnect the session using ISession.Disconnect() and reconnect using ISession.Reconnect().

In the documentation you find:

The method ISession.Disconnect() will disconnect the session from the ADO.NET connection and return the connection to the pool (unless you provided the connection).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply but I think you're wrong with the "second" mode. When the session is disposed the connection stays open. As you can see in the code snipped I posted above (ConnectionManager.cs) it's not possible to disconnect/reconnect within a transaction scope. In the link you provided it is also said that you must first commit/abort the transaction before you can disconnect/reconnect again. The connection (IDbConnection) is controlled by the ConnectionManager class as a private member and not by the transaction. –  Antineutrino Sep 27 '11 at 12:10

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