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I have seen some code like below, and it is strange that the __get method has been called twice, why?

class Foo {
    private $bar;

    function __get($name){
        echo "__get is called!";
        return $this->$name;
    }

    function __unset($name){
        unset($this->$name);
    }
}
$foo = new Foo;
unset($foo->bar);
echo $foo->bar;

Attention: unset($foo->bar) will not call the __get.

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Maybe it just reads it when instantiating the object to cache the fields in memory? Or it reads the field first before unsetting it? Does it hurt when it gets called twice? ;-) –  Sebastian Wramba Sep 27 '11 at 10:27
    
@JonStirling __get has been called twice but not once. –  xdazz Sep 27 '11 at 10:27
    
@SebastianWramba So what is the reason? –  xdazz Sep 27 '11 at 10:30
    
by the way, this happens only when you use unset. Without unset it is called only once(the normal). –  Yousf Sep 27 '11 at 10:32
    
@Yousf I know that, so what happened after unset? :) –  xdazz Sep 27 '11 at 10:35
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For me, it looks like a bug. Put some debugging code (the following) and see the result:

<?php

class Foo {
    private $bar;

    function __get($name){
        echo "__get(".$name.") is called!\n";
        debug_print_backtrace();
        $x = $this->$name;
        return $x;
    }

    function __unset($name){
        unset($this->$name);

        echo "Value of ". $name ." After unsetting is \n";
        echo $this->$name;
        echo  "\n";
    }
}
echo "Before\n";
$foo = new Foo;
echo "After1\n";
unset($foo->bar);
echo "After2\n";
echo $foo->bar;
echo "After3\n";
echo $foo->not_found;
?>

The result is:

Before
After1
Value of bar After unsetting is
__get(bar) is called!
#0  Foo->__get(bar) called at [E:\temp\t1.php:17]
#1  Foo->__unset(bar) called at [E:\temp\t1.php:24]
PHP Notice:  Undefined property: Foo::$bar in E:\temp\t1.php on line 9

After2
__get(bar) is called!
#0  Foo->__get(bar) called at [E:\temp\t1.php:26]
__get(bar) is called!
#0  Foo->__get(bar) called at [E:\temp\t1.php:9]
#1  Foo->__get(bar) called at [E:\temp\t1.php:26]
PHP Notice:  Undefined property: Foo::$bar in E:\temp\t1.php on line 9
After3
__get(not_found) is called!
#0  Foo->__get(not_found) called at [E:\temp\t1.php:28]
PHP Notice:  Undefined property: Foo::$not_found in E:\temp\t1.php on line 9
share|improve this answer
    
No, it is not a bug. –  magallanes Sep 27 '11 at 11:02
add comment

invoked in

1)

 return $this->$name;

2)

 echo $foo->bar;

in the code:

    class Foo {
        private $bar;

        function __get($name){
            echo "__get is called!";
            return $this->$name;  *** here ***
        }

        function __unset($name){
            unset($this->$name);
        }
    }
    $foo = new Foo;
    unset($foo->bar);
    echo $foo->bar;   *** and here ***

__get() is utilized for reading data from inaccessible properties.

so, un-setting the variable, turn $foo->bar and $this->bar inaccessible. However, if unset is removed then $foo->bar is inaccessible but $this->bar is accessible.

However, i don't know how PHP avoid to call the function recursively. May be PHP is smart or the variable is self-setting at some point.

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This does not help at all, it does not explain anything!? –  Sebastian Wramba Sep 27 '11 at 10:49
    
__get method has been called twice, why? because it is invoked twice. –  magallanes Sep 27 '11 at 10:50
    
Alright, now it's clear what you meant. Removed my downvote. But still not correct. You're saying that the getter calls himself when returning the variable, which would result in an infinite loop. –  Sebastian Wramba Sep 27 '11 at 10:52
    
Yes, however php is enough smart for avoid it. It is pretty easy to prove it, simple replace the return by another different value. –  magallanes Sep 27 '11 at 10:58
    
@magallanes So why __get is called just once if you echo $foo->boo? It is also happened that $foo->boo and $this->boo inaccessible. –  xdazz Sep 28 '11 at 2:24
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The magic __get function is called everytime you try to access a variable. If you look at your code, you do this exactly 2 times. Once in the unset function and once in the echo function.

unset($foo->bar);
echo $foo->bar;

share|improve this answer
1  
If you comment out the last line, you will know that unset($foo->bar) will not call the __get method. –  xdazz Sep 27 '11 at 10:32
2  
This is not true, calling unset($foo->bar) doesn't trigger __get. –  Yousf Sep 27 '11 at 10:32
    
So only calling unset and echo in combination makes __get get called twice, whereas echo alone does trigger __get, but unset alone does not. This is rather funny. –  Sebastian Wramba Sep 27 '11 at 10:42
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