Sign up ×
Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other. Join them; it only takes a minute:

The reserve column is a varchar, to perform sums on it I want to cast it to a deciaml. But the SQL below gives me an error

cast(Reserve as decimal)
from MyReserves

Error converting data type varchar to numeric.

I added the isnumeric and not null to try and avoid this error but it still persists, any ideas why?

cast(Reserve as decimal)
from MyReserves
where isnumeric(Reserve ) = 1
and MyReserves is not null
share|improve this question
Can you show some data in Reserve column ? – Upendra Chaudhari Sep 27 '11 at 10:46
You have to be carefull with isnumeric, as it might return results that are incorrect. This is from the documentation **ISNUMERIC returns 1 for some characters that are not numbers, such as plus (+), minus (-), and valid currency symbols such as the dollar sign ($). ** Have a look at… – Adriaan Stander Sep 27 '11 at 10:50
@astander - it doesn't return results that are incorrect. It's just that most people don't appreciate that it answers a question that no-one ever actually wants to ask ("will this string convert to at least one of the numeric types?") – Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 27 '11 at 10:52
You seem to be assuming that the cast will happen after the where. This is absolutely not guaranteed in any event irrespective of the limitations of isnumeric – Martin Smith Sep 27 '11 at 10:58
@MartinSmith - I think you should add this as an answer – Ed Harper Sep 27 '11 at 11:26

10 Answers 10

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It seems that isnumeric has some Problems: (link forbidden as of 04/30/2014)

According to that Link you can solve it like that:

cast(Reserve as decimal)
from MyReserves
where MyReserves is not null
and MyReserves * 1 = MyReserves 
share|improve this answer
Lets try: declare @i nvarchar(100)='+' IF ISNUMERIC(@i)=1 AND @i*1=@i PRINT 'Numeric' ELSE PRINT 'NON-Numeric' ---- result:Numeric (Incorrect) It is because SELECT ('+' * 1) gives to you '0' – Dalex Sep 27 '11 at 11:03
This does not work. Try the following: SELECT '9874211x' * 1 – brian Sep 27 '11 at 18:01

See here: CAST and IsNumeric

Try this:

WHERE IsNumeric(Reserve + '.0e0') = 1 AND reserve IS NOT NULL


Default of decimal is (18,0), so

declare @i nvarchar(100)='12121212121211212122121'--length is>18 
SELECT ISNUMERIC(@i) --gives 1
SELECT CAST(@i as decimal)--throws an error
share|improve this answer

isnumeric is not 100% reliable in SQL - see this question Why does ISNUMERIC('.') return 1?

I would guess that you have value in the reserve column that passes the isnumeric test but will not cast to decimal.

share|improve this answer

Gosh, nobody seems to have explained this correctly. SQL is a descriptive language. It does not specify the order of operations.

The problem that you are (well, were) having is that the where does not do the filtering before the conversion takes place. Order of operations, though, is guaranteed for a case statement. So, the following will work:

select cast(case when isnumeric(Reserve) = 1 then Reserve end as decimal)
from MyReserves
where isnumeric(Reserve ) = 1 and MyReserves is not null

The issue has nothing to do with the particular numeric format you are converting to or with the isnumeric() function. It is simply that the ordering of operations is not guaranteed.

share|improve this answer

I had this same problem and it turned out to be scientific notation such as '1.72918E-13' To find this just do where Reserve LIKE '%E%'. Try bypassing these and see if it works. You'll have to write code to convert these to something usable or reformat your source file so it doesn't store any numbers using scientific notation.

share|improve this answer

Use try_cast (sql 2012)

try_cast(Reserve as decimal)
from MyReserves
share|improve this answer

IsNumeric is possibly not ideal in your scenario as from the highlighted Note on this MSDN page it says "ISNUMERIC returns 1 for some characters that are not numbers, such as plus (+), minus (-), and valid currency symbols such as the dollar sign ($)."

Also there is a nice article here which further discusses ISNUMERIC.

share|improve this answer

Try (for example):

cast(Reserve as decimal(10,2))
from MyReserves

Numeric/Decimal generally want a precision an scale.

share|improve this answer

Just a heads up on isnumeric; if the string contains some numbers and an 'E' followed by some numbers, this is viewed as an exponent. Example, select isnumeric('123E0') returns 1.

share|improve this answer
It also does the same for 'D' Try: SELECT IsNumeric( '123D45') As [Useless Function] – Antony Booth Apr 26 at 17:09

IsNumeric is a problem child -- SQL 2012 and later has TRY_CAST and TRY_CONVERT

If you're on an earlier version then you can write a function that'll convert to a decimal (or NULL if it won't convert). This uses the XML conversion functions that don't throw errors when the number won't fit ;)

-- Create function to convert a varchar to a decimal (returns null if it fails)
IF EXISTS( SELECT * FROM sys.objects WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID( N'[dbo].[ToDecimal]' ) AND type IN( N'FN',N'IF',N'TF',N'FS',N'FT' ))
    DROP FUNCTION [dbo].[ToDecimal];

    @Value VARCHAR(MAX)
    -- Uses XML/XPath to convert @Value to Decimal because it returns NULL it doesn't cast correctly
    DECLARE @ValueAsXml XML
    SELECT @ValueAsXml = Col FROM (SELECT (SELECT @Value as Value FOR XMl RAW, ELEMENTS) AS Col) AS test
    DECLARE @Result DECIMAL(38,10)
    -- XML/XPath will return NULL if the VARCHAR can't be converted to a DECIMAL(38,10)
    SET @Result =  @ValueAsXml.value('(/row/Value)[1] cast as xs:decimal?', 'DECIMAL(38,10)')
    RETURN CASE -- Check if the number is within the range for a DECIMAL(18,8)
        WHEN @Result >= -999999999999999999.99999999 AND @Result <= 999999999999999999.99999999
            THEN CONVERT(DECIMAL(18,8),@Result) 

Then just change your query to:

select dbo.ToDecimal(Reserve) from MyReserves
share|improve this answer

Your Answer


By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.