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In an interview they told me

Write the code in the brackets to order the list. They said order but you dont know if the type is going to be int or decimal.

They also told me not to use framework methods like .sort

So I have no idea how would I do it? I need to be ready for the next time somebody asks me this.

Possible Inputs: 7,3,8,6,1
Or: 6.9, 4.5, 2.3, 6.1, 9.9

namespace InterViewPreparation1
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void btnSort_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            List<int> list= new List<int>();
            list.Add(int.Parse(i1.Text));
            list.Add(int.Parse(i2.Text));
            list.Add(int.Parse(i3.Text));
            list.Add(int.Parse(i4.Text));
            list.Add(int.Parse(i5.Text));
            Sort(list);
        }


        private void Sort<T>(List<T> list)
        {
            bool madeChanges;
            int itemCount = list.Count;
            do
            {
                madeChanges = false;
                itemCount--;
                for (int i = 0; i < itemCount; i++)
                {
                    int result = Comparer<T>.Default.Compare(list[i], list[i + 1]);

                    if (result > 0)
                    {
                        Swap(list, i, i + 1);
                        madeChanges = true;
                    }
                }
            } while (madeChanges);            
        }


        public  List<T> Swap<T>(this List<T> list,
                int firstIndex,
                int secondIndex)
        {
            T temp = list[firstIndex];
            list[firstIndex] = list[secondIndex];
            list[secondIndex] = temp;

            return list;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Howcome there's no generic parameter on your List? –  Gleno Sep 27 '11 at 11:02
2  
Since you're not in the interview anymore, you can use Google. What have you tried yourself? –  CodeCaster Sep 27 '11 at 11:03
1  
Just use if(list[i] < list[i+1]) comparisons? –  Ian Sep 27 '11 at 11:03
2  
I guess the idea is that they want you to write your own sort using IComparable<T> to compare the elements. –  Sven Sep 27 '11 at 11:04
2  
@Ian < doesn't work with T –  Andrey Sep 27 '11 at 11:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, both Int and Double implement IComparable - this means that you should cast each element to an IComparable when performing your sort. As you can't use any standard .Net sorting method you need to implement one yourself. See Sorting algorithm for some inspiration.

It would be easier if the method signature was different:

public void sortlist<T>(List<T> list)
    where T : IComparable
{

}

An example implementation of bubble sort:

for (int pass = 1; pass < list.Count; pass++)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < list.Count; i++)
    {
        if (list[i].CompareTo(list[i + 1]) > 0)
        {
            // Swap
            T temp = list[i];
            list[i] = list[i + 1];
            list[i + 1] = temp;
        }
    }
}

Alternatively if T isn't constrained to IComparable then you can tweak this slightly as per Marcs suggestion by using Comparer<T>.Default:

Comparer<T>.Default.Compare(list[i], list[i + 1])
share|improve this answer
    
can you please check the edit, I have some compiler errors, I am trying to do this exercise in a simple winform. but I am having problems –  Esteban V Sep 27 '11 at 11:24
1  
@Luis Compiles fine for me, are you sure that you are declaring the type parameter T in either your class name or method body? You should read up on generics –  Justin Sep 27 '11 at 11:32
    
pls see the edit, I am very close to the solution, but I have this compiler error: Extension method must be defined in a non-generic static class –  Esteban V Sep 27 '11 at 12:09

It depends how far down the line of "don't use framework methods" you go. Or should we be using logic probes against raw memory? Frankly, not just using list.Sort() is stupid (it is a bad interview question, IMO; I'd argue "no, I'm using list.Sort() - it exists and does the job nicely").

But! Another approach here would be to obtain:

var comparer = System.Collections.Generic.Comparer<T>.Default;

now you have a type-safe comparer that will work for any T with sortability. The act of calling .Compare lots of times to place into sequence is left as an exercise, and any text-book sorting strategy will work using comparer.Compare(x, y).

share|improve this answer
    
can you please check the edit, I have some compiler errors, I am trying to do this exercise in a simple winform. but I am having problems –  Esteban V Sep 27 '11 at 11:24
1  
@Luis as per Justin's answer - private void Sort<T>(List<T> list) –  Marc Gravell Sep 27 '11 at 11:26
    
pls see the edit, I am very close to the solution, but I have this compiler error: Extension method must be defined in a non-generic static class –  Esteban V Sep 27 '11 at 12:08

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