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I have a huge string like:

ABCDEFGHIJKLM...

and I would like to split it into substrings of length 5 in this way:

>1
ABCDE
>2
BCDEF
>3
CDEFG

[...]

UPDATE

Solution:
ok, thanks to you guys I was able to find way to do this fast!. This is my sollution combining few ideas from here:

str="ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOP"
splitfive(){ echo $1 | cut -c $2- |sed -r 's/(.{5})/\1\n/g' ; }
for (( i=0 ; i <= 5 ; i++ )) ; do splitfive "$str" $i ; done | grep -v "^$"

share|improve this question
1  
Please accept one of the answers as the correct one, or answer this post with your own solution and accept that one. – Juhana Sep 27 '11 at 16:38
    
Your splitfive could be more efficient. There's no need to pipe to cut, in bash you could say cut -c "$2"- <<<"$1" | sed etc and it will be slightly better. – Sorpigal Sep 28 '11 at 11:48
    
Your sed expression could also be improved to sed 's/...../&\n/g' which executes about twice as fast. – Sorpigal Sep 28 '11 at 11:56
${string:position:length}

Extracts $length characters of substring from $string at $position.

stringZ=abcABC123ABCabc
#       0123456789.....
#       0-based indexing.

echo ${stringZ:0}                            # abcABC123ABCabc
echo ${stringZ:1}                            # bcABC123ABCabc
echo ${stringZ:7}                            # 23ABCabc

echo ${stringZ:0:5}                          # abcAB
                                             # Five characters of substring.

Then use a loop to go through and add 1 to the position to extract each substring of length 5.

for i in seq 0 ${#stringZ}; do
    echo ${stringZ:$i:5}
done

All from Bash string manipulation

share|improve this answer
    
{0..${#stringZ}} will be expanded to a literal "{1..15}" instead of "1 2 3 4 .. 15". Couldn't find out why exactly, I think the nested curly brackets are the problem. However, working around it using "for i in seq 0 ${#stringZ}" will just work fine. – Alexander Janssen Sep 27 '11 at 11:59
    
Cool, thanks for the tip @Alex – chown Sep 27 '11 at 19:06

sed can do it in one shot:

kent$  echo "abcdefghijklmnopqr"|sed -r 's/(.{5})/\1 /g'
abcde fghij klmno pqr

or

depends on your needs:

kent$  echo "abcdefghijklmnopqr"|sed -r 's/(.{5})/\1\n/g' 
abcde
fghij
klmno
pqr

update

i thought it was just simply split string problem, didn't read the question very carefully. Now it should give what you need:

still one shot, but with awk this time:

kent$  echo "abcdefghijklmnopqr"|awk '{while(length($0)>=5){print substr($0,1,5);gsub(/^./,"")}}'

abcde
bcdef
cdefg
defgh
efghi
fghij
ghijk
hijkl
ijklm
jklmn
klmno
lmnop
mnopq
nopqr
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I need: abcde, bcdef,cdefg, defgh... – didymos Sep 27 '11 at 12:03
    
see my updated answer. a awk oneliner – Kent Sep 27 '11 at 12:13
    
hmmm I do not know why but I am getting only abcde, the rest is not printed – didymos Sep 27 '11 at 12:29
    
what's your awk version? (awk --version) it should work with gawk. try replace awk with gawk. or nawk if you are on a Sun unix box. – Kent Sep 27 '11 at 12:43
    
thanks, with gawk is working ok, however for my huge string is still to slow - but I am working on to speed this up – didymos Sep 27 '11 at 15:45

In bash:

s=ABCDEFGHIJ
for (( i=0; i < ${#s}-4; i++ )); do 
  printf ">%d\n%s\n" $((i+1)) ${s:$i:5}
done

outputs

>1
ABCDE
>2
BCDEF
>3
CDEFG
>4
DEFGH
>5
EFGHI
>6
FGHIJ
share|improve this answer

Would sed do it?:

$ sed 's/\(.....\)/\1\n/g' < filecontaininghugestring
share|improve this answer
1  
sed 's/...../&\n/g' filename is sufficient, but doesn't solve the problem (and also requires that \n be understood, which not all sed implementaions can do). – Sorpigal Sep 27 '11 at 13:25

...or use the split command:

$ ls

$ echo "abcdefghijklmnopqr" | split -b5

$ ls
xaa  xab  xac  xad

$ cat xaa
abcde

split also operates on files...

share|improve this answer
str=ABCDEFGHIJKLM
splitfive(){ echo "${1:$2:5}" ; }
for (( i=0 ; i < ${#str} ; i++ )) ; do splitfive "$str" $i ; done

Or, perhaps you want to do something more intelligent with the results

#!/usr/bin/env bash

splitstr(){
    printf '%s\n' "${1:$2:$3}"
}

n=$1
offset=$2

declare -a by_fives

while IFS= read -r str ; do
    for (( i=0 ; i < ${#str} ; i++ )) ; do
            by_fives=("${by_fives[@]}" "$(splitstr "$str" $i $n)")
    done
done

echo ${by_fives[$offset]}

And then call it

$ split-by 5 2 <<<"ABCDEFGHIJKLM"
CDEFG

You can adapt it from there.

EDIT: trivial version in C, for performance comparison:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void){
    FILE* f;
    int n=0;
    char five[6];

    five[5] = '\0';

    f = fopen("inputfile", "r");

    if(f!=0){
            fread(&five, sizeof(char), 5, f);
            while(!feof(f)){
                    printf("%s\n", five);
                    fseek(f, ++n, SEEK_SET);

                    fread(&five, sizeof(char), 5, f);
            }
    }

    return 0;
}

Forgive my bad C, I really don't knw the language.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! your first idea is ok, but for my purposes is extremely slow... I have very huge string - 10^8 characters... so dividing it into substrings takes lot of time... – didymos Sep 27 '11 at 11:58
    
@didymos: It depends on what you're actually doing and whether you want to process each set, find a particular offset, or what have you. What is your goal? – Sorpigal Sep 27 '11 at 12:31

sed can do it:

 sed -nr ':a;h;s/(.{5}).*/\1/p;g;s/.//;ta;' <<<"ABCDEFGHIJKLM" | # split string
     sed '=' | sed '1~2s/^/>/' # add line numbers and insert '>'
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You could use cut and specify characters instead of fields, and then change output delimiter to whatever you need, like new line:

echo "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOP" | cut --output-delimiter=$'\n' -c1-5,6-10,11-15

output

ABCDE
FGHIJ
KLMNO

or

echo "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOP" | cut --output-delimiter=$':' -c1-5,6-10,11-15 

output

ABCDE:FGHIJ:KLMNO
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