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Can anyone give me a jQuery example of how to:

  1. Rotate an image by a static number of degrees (say 30 degrees)
  2. Apply a drop-shadow effect to the rotated image
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2  
What's wrong with doing this with CSS? –  Bojangles Sep 27 '11 at 11:31
    
Is that even possible...? –  Keith Palmer - consolibyte Sep 27 '11 at 12:22
    
Yep - see genesis' answer. –  Bojangles Sep 27 '11 at 12:29

2 Answers 2

-webkit-transform: rotate(30deg);
-moz-transform: rotate(30deg);
filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.BasicImage(rotation=1);
-moz-box-shadow:2px 2px 4px #999999;
-webkit-box-shadow:2px 2px 4px #999999;
box-shadow:2px 2px 4px #999999;

will do it

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Is there by chance a way to make the image anti-alias against whatever it's overlayed over? So that you don't see the hard pixels of the rotation? –  Keith Palmer - consolibyte Sep 29 '11 at 22:08
    
Oh and- this works GREAT! (except it'd be even greater if it would anti-alias) –  Keith Palmer - consolibyte Sep 29 '11 at 22:08
    
@KeithPalmer: I'm afraid - no, not as long as you rely on browser –  genesis Sep 29 '11 at 22:13
    
... this doesn't work for Internet Explorer?!? –  Keith Palmer - consolibyte Sep 30 '11 at 12:05
    
@Keith probably, because IE is not so good one. I think you'll everytime have problems with IE :/ –  genesis Sep 30 '11 at 12:09
up vote 0 down vote accepted

@genesis' answer doesn't seem to support Internet Explorer, as the DXImageTransform.Microsoft.BasicImage(rotation=) parameter only supports 90, 180, and 270 degree increments (docs here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms532918(v=vs.85).aspx.

A better solution I've found is to use a combination of @genesis' answer, and a jQuery plugin found here: http://code.google.com/p/jqueryrotate/

Use the jQuery code to rotate the image by whatever amount:

$('#photo1').rotate(-8);

And then use this modification of @genesis' code to apply the drop-shadow:

-webkit-transform: rotate(30deg);
-moz-transform: rotate(30deg);
filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.BasicImage(rotation=1);
-moz-box-shadow:2px 2px 4px #999999;
-webkit-box-shadow:2px 2px 4px #999999;

The modification doesn't include this line:

box-shadow:2px 2px 4px #999999;

Because including that line gets you an ugly black background in Internet Explorer for some reason. It seems to work fine without it.

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