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While going through an Objective C programming book just now . I noticed this code

@interface Fraction: NSObject
{
   int  numerator;
   int  denominator;
}

-(void)   print;
-(void)   setNumerator: (int) n;
-(void)   setDenominator: (int) d;

@end

Author does great job in explaining every thing in this book but there is no mention on whether this is same as just

 @interface Fraction
    {
       int  numerator;
       int  denominator;
    }

    -(void)   print;
    -(void)   setNumerator: (int) n;
    -(void)   setDenominator: (int) d;

    @end

reason I am asking this rather very simple question is that in JAVA every thing by default extends Object and you do not need to say that. Now of course they are two very different languages but it was a natural question that came to my mind.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, the two examples are not the same. @interface Fraction creates a new root class that is not associated with the NSObject hierarchy at all. As such, it won't even respond to +alloc; you would have to implement your own allocation method. You almost never want to do that.

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They are not the same. In your second example you define a class that does not derive from another class and is thus a root class (like NSObject or NSProxy). You almost never want to create a root class yourself (except if you're a 1337 h4x0r and know really well what you're doing and why).

The reason why you don't want to create your own root class is that you would have to re-implement a lot of stuff that NSObject gives you, like respondsToSelector: or performSelectorInBackground:withObject: or even retain, release and autorelease.

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The thrust of your post is spot on, but the methods you mention are poor arguments, because they are in fact all in the NSObject protocol, which could be adopted by a new root class. –  Josh Caswell Sep 27 '11 at 18:22
    
Of course you could implement them, but my point was that doing so would be non-trivial. –  DarkDust Sep 27 '11 at 19:07
    
Not any better or worse than re-implementing the methods of the class proper, IMO, but fair enough. –  Josh Caswell Sep 27 '11 at 19:18

Create 2 classes, ChildObject which extends NSObject and OrphanObjects with no parent class.

@interface ChildObject : NSObject

@end

@interface OrphanObject

@end

Now try to override the -(id)init; method.

- (id)init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        // Initialization code here.
    }

    return self;
}

For the ChildObject class, everything will work fine. For the OrphanObject class, the compiler won't let you call [super init], because there is no "super" class. Which means, you have to actually tell the compiler that you want to extend NSObject.

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It is necessary to explicitly declare the super class including NSObject. Every class does not have to be a subclass of NSObject but not subclassing NSObject is rare.

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