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public:
    const int x;
    base():x(5){}

};

class der : public base {
public:
    der():x(10){}
};

der d;

My aim is when instance of base class is created it will initialise x as 5 and when instance of der class is created it will initialise x as 10. But compiler is giving error. As x is inherited from class base, why is it giving error?

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3  
Because const means it can't be changed? Remove the const keyword and get on with your life. –  trojanfoe Sep 27 '11 at 11:51
    
i am not changing, i am only assigning it into derive class –  user966379 Sep 27 '11 at 11:52
    
@trojanfoe: because a Derived class cannot initialize a Base attribute in its initializer list. –  Matthieu M. Sep 27 '11 at 12:24
2  
The correct fix in C++ for problems with const is almost never to just ignore them by removing const until they go away. But this isn't a problem with const, it's a problem with initializer lists, and merely removing const will not make it go away. That said, there's an issue with non-static const data members of classes, that you'll find the class cannot be assigned in the default way. So you can't write base a; base b; a = b;, because the synthesized assignment operator can't do a.x = b.x;. So you'd have to implement your own assignment operator if you want to write a = b. –  Steve Jessop Sep 27 '11 at 12:25
    
@SteveJessop If x is part of the state of the object, and x is constant, then meaningful assignment is impossible anyway. IMO a public const data member that is part of the object state may be legitimate design choice, but you have to be consistent and not pretend you can do assignment when you can't. OTOH, the constant data member may be part of the identity and not part of the value of the object. It isn't clear from the example. –  curiousguy Sep 27 '11 at 13:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can't initialize a base class member in the initializer list for a constructor in the derived class. The initializer list can contain bases, and members in this class, but not members in bases.

Admittedly, the standardese for this isn't entirely clear. 12.6.2/2 of C++03:

Unless the mem-initializer-id names a nonstatic data member of the constructor’s class or a direct or virtual base of that class, the mem-initializer is ill-formed.

It means "(a nonstatic data member of the constructor's class) or (a direct or virtual base)". It doesn't mean "a nonstatic data member of (the constructor's class or a direct or virtual base)". The sentence is ambiguous, but if you took the second reading then you couldn't put bases in the initializer-list at all, and the very next sentence in the standard makes it clear that you can.

As for why it's not allowed, that's a standard rationale question and I'm guessing at the motives of the authors of the standard. But basically because it's the base class's responsibility to initialize its own members, not the derived class's responsibility.

Probably you should add an int constructor to base.

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If it was allowed, the member would be initialised twice, unless you introduce the concept that a derived ctor init-list can override a base ctor init-list for accessible members or base classes. It would break encapsulation in the case of base, as it breaks the idea that a public const variable is a constant set in the ctor of the class that declares it. Compare with virtual base classes initialisation. –  curiousguy Sep 27 '11 at 13:55

You can make this work with a little adjustment...

#include <cassert>

class base
{
public:
    const int x;
    base()
        :x(5)
    {
    }

protected:
    base(const int default_x)
        :x(default_x)
    {
    }
};

class der: public base
{
public:
    der()
        :base(10)
    {
    }
};

struct der2: public base
{
    der2()
        :base()
    {
    }
};

int main()
{
    base b;
    assert(b.x == 5);
    der d;
    assert(d.x == 10);
    der2 d2;
    assert(d2.x == 5);
    return d.x;
}

This provides a constructor, accessible by derived classes, that can provide a default value with which to initialise base.x.

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It doesn't compile if you try to declare an object of type base. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 27 '11 at 12:02
1  
... because the protected constructor's parameter shouldn't have a default. There's no benefit in having one, since without it the no-args constructor will be used anyway. –  Steve Jessop Sep 27 '11 at 12:06
    
I was editing this while you commented and down-voted. It's fixed now. –  Johnsyweb Sep 27 '11 at 12:07
    
And I fixed my vote. Perhaps too rash :) Sry –  Luchian Grigore Sep 27 '11 at 12:22
1  
@curiousguy: const in the parameter list may not be extremely useful here, but it is also harmless, and could prevent future errors from appearing when the body of the constructor will change, so why not have it? –  Luc Touraille Sep 27 '11 at 15:26

This works.

class base {
public:
    static const int x = 5;
};

class der : public base {
public:
    static const int x = 10;
};

If you want to change x depending on your constructor, you have to make it non-static.

A non-static const is the same as a non-const variable once compiled. If you want to enforce a member variable to be read-only, use non-static const. If you want to set a constant whose scope is restricted to a single class, use static const.

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2  
No. It will be constant even without static. But it will be constant for the object, not for the whole class (as would a static do). –  Luchian Grigore Sep 27 '11 at 12:09
1  
A non-static const is NOT the same as a non-const variable. Your example is completely different than the question. Do you know what static does? Your member x will be THE SAME for all instances of the class, whereas a non-static const can differ between instances. Even if the op's code doesn't exemplify this, it still doesn't make it ok. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 27 '11 at 12:21
1  
The main difference between using a static or non-static data member here is what happens when you write der d; ((base*)&d)->x;. If you use a static data member you get 5, if you use a non-static data member you get 10. So the questioner should decide which to use on the basis of what result is needed for that expression, and others like it -- should each object have its own copy of x, or not. –  Steve Jessop Sep 27 '11 at 12:33
2  
:| Once again, they are not the same. You can't change the non-static const, whereas you can change the non-const variable. Furthermore, it's the third time I'm saying that in the op's question, the constant's scope is not class-wide, but object-wide. –  Luchian Grigore Sep 27 '11 at 12:34
1  
@Pubby8: a non-static non-const and non-static const data member are not entirely the same once compiled. The compiler is allowed to apply more optimizations to the latter, so for example if you do base b; some_fn_with_unknown_effect(&b); std::cout << b.x;, then if x is const the compiler is allowed to use a fixed value 5 for the output, whereas if x is non-const it has to load it from b after calling the function. It's UB to change the const member through casting/memcpy, hence the difference, and it may or may not "appear to work". –  Steve Jessop Sep 27 '11 at 13:06

This may be over-engineered compared the original question, but please consider:

template <typename T, class C, int index=0> 
// C and index just to avoid ambiguity
class constant_member {
    const T m;
    constant_member (T m_) :m(m_) {}
};

class base : virtual public constant_member<int, base> {
public:
    base () : constant_member<int, base>(5) {}
    int x () const { return constant_member<int, base>::m; }
};

class der : public base {
public:
    der () : constant_member<int, base>(10) {}
};

class der2 : public der{
public:
    der2 () {} // ill-formed: no match for 
               // constant_member<int, base>::constant_member() 
};

Comment: This is verbose, non-obvious (maybe impossible to understand for beginners), and it will be very inefficient to convert to virtual base class just to read a member variable. I am not really suggesting this as a real world solution.

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