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I have the following query:

SELECT a.HotelID,a.Hotelname,GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT b.OperatorName) AS Operators
FROM hotels AS a
INNER JOIN operators AS b
ON a.HotelID = b.HotelID
GROUP BY a.HotelID
ORDER BY a.HotelID
LIMIT 100

I need this query for a simple search function. The result Table should contain Paging. So what I did was I runned this query (without LIMIT) to get the number of rows (which I need to calculate the pages and so on) and then I rerun that query with the LIMIT.

In fact the query itself takes 4-5sec (against 300k table, with indexes on all the fields) which means it currently takes 10sec to load because it runs two times.

I am wondering if there is a SQL Statement I can simply use to get the number of rows and which might be faster. I thought I can use COUNT(a.HotelID) but this not works.

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3 Answers 3

update

select count(*) from (
SELECT distinct b.HotelID
FROM hotels AS a
INNER JOIN operators AS b
ON a.HotelID = b.HotelID    
)

can this be faster?

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Yes that works but it takes about 4sec. Is this usual or can this be faster ? –  user459611 Sep 27 '11 at 12:12
    
i updated the answer, give it a try, see if it is faster. –  Kent Sep 27 '11 at 12:19
    
No, it is not faster. Still 4sec –  user459611 Sep 27 '11 at 12:25
    
Ok I made a mistake that i tested with a mac client. Seems the connection here is not the best. On the server itself I get the following (with group by and so on): 1.64sec, and without the group by ... 0.46sec. In the Webapp (UI) it still feels like 10sec –  user459611 Sep 27 '11 at 12:36

give this a try:

SELECT *
FROM (
    SELECT a.HotelID,a.Hotelname,GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT b.OperatorName) AS Operators, COUNT(a.HotelID) AS total
    FROM hotels AS a
    INNER JOIN operators AS b
    ON a.HotelID = b.HotelID
    GROUP BY a.HotelID
    ) AS a
ORDER BY a.HotelID
LIMIT 100

also, for the speed you should make sure your indexes are in order.

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1  
Can you maybe explain me how I can check if the indexes are in order and if not how to correct this ? –  user459611 Sep 27 '11 at 12:17
    
My knowledge about db indexes is very limited, I'd suggest you look into it on the web, this databasejournal.com/features/mysql/article.php/1382791/… seems to be a rather simple explanation. I'm guessing you'll want to index the hotelID on both hotels and operators. –  red-X Sep 27 '11 at 12:53
    
I already have indexes on all fields in both tables. Also tried selecting differend Index Types (currently I use BTREE but I also tested Hashes) –  user459611 Sep 27 '11 at 13:02

Clearly described in the manual:

SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS tells MySQL to calculate how many rows there would be in the result set, disregarding any LIMIT clause. The number of rows can then be retrieved with SELECT FOUND_ROWS(). See Section 11.13, “Information Functions”.

If you follow the link to Section 11.13, there's then an example:

FOUND_ROWS()

A SELECT statement may include a LIMIT clause to restrict the number of rows the server returns to the client. In some cases, it is desirable to know how many rows the statement would have returned without the LIMIT, but without running the statement again. To obtain this row count, include a SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS option in the SELECT statement, and then invoke FOUND_ROWS() afterward:

mysql> SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS * FROM tbl_name
    -> WHERE id > 100 LIMIT 10;
mysql> SELECT FOUND_ROWS();

The second SELECT returns a number indicating how many rows the first SELECT would have returned had it been written without the LIMIT clause.

In the absence of the SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS option in the most recent successful SELECT statement, FOUND_ROWS() returns the number of rows in the result set returned by that statement. If the statement includes a LIMIT clause, FOUND_ROWS() returns the number of rows up to the limit. For example, FOUND_ROWS() returns 10 or 60, respectively, if the statement includes LIMIT 10 or LIMIT 50, 10.

Please, use the documentation as your first port of call.

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wow. Thank you! Yes I know, for this weekend I planed to go through the whole documentation and look what cool other things I do not know. –  user459611 Sep 28 '11 at 10:56
1  
@WorldSignia: You're already using LIMIT, so you should already be reading the documentation for it if you want to know how it works and what else it can do. As I said, first port of call... not last! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 28 '11 at 11:07
1  
Yes correct. I just also figured out the SQL_CACHE parameter. The results are now coming up pretty fast :) –  user459611 Sep 28 '11 at 11:13
    
@WorldSignia: I didn't even know about that cache. Thanks! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 28 '11 at 14:49

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