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How do I convert (or create) a singleton class that compiles and behaves correctly when using automatic reference counting (ARC) in Xcode 4.2?

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1  
I recently found an Article from Matt Galloway going quite in depth on Singletons for both ARC and manual memory management environments. galloway.me.uk/tutorials/singleton-classes –  cescofry Oct 14 '13 at 11:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 218 down vote accepted

In exactly the same way that you (should) have been doing it already:

+ (MyClass *)sharedInstance
{
    static MyClass *sharedInstance = nil;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        sharedInstance = [[MyClass alloc] init];
        // Do any other initialisation stuff here
    });
    return sharedInstance;
}
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7  
You just don't do any of the memory management hokey pokey Apple used to recommend in developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/… –  Christopher Pickslay Sep 27 '11 at 21:05
17  
That is because he is using ARC. Completely right answer. –  Marsson Jan 19 '12 at 10:33
1  
@MakingScienceFictionFact, you might want to take a look at this post –  kervich Jul 24 '12 at 6:58
5  
@David static variables declared within a method/function are the same as a static variable declared outside a method/function, they are just only valid within the scope of that method/function. Every separate run through the +sharedInstance method (even on different threads) will 'see' the same sharedInstance variable. –  Nick Forge Aug 3 '12 at 4:08
5  
What about if somebody calls [[MyClass alloc] init]? That would create a new object. How can we avoid this (other than declaring static MyClass *sharedInstance = nil outside the method). –  Ricardo Sánchez-Sáez Dec 7 '12 at 10:22

if you want to create other instance as needed.do this:

+ (MyClass *)sharedInstance
{
    static MyClass *sharedInstance = nil;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        sharedInstance = [[MyClass alloc] init];
        // Do any other initialisation stuff here
    });
    return sharedInstance;
}

else,you should do this:

+ (id)allocWithZone:(NSZone *)zone
{
    static MyClass *sharedInstance = nil;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        sharedInstance = [super allocWithZone:zone];
    });
    return sharedInstance;
}
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True/False: The dispatch_once() bit means that you won't get additional instances, even in the first example...? –  Olie May 9 '13 at 18:04
3  
@Olie: False, because client code can do [[MyClass alloc] init] and bypass the sharedInstance access. DongXu, you should look at Peter Hosey's Singleton article. If you're going to override allocWithZone: to prevent more instances from being created, you also should override init to prevent the shared instance from being re-initialized. –  Josh Caswell May 20 '13 at 19:43
    
Ok, that's what I thought, hence the allocWithZone: version. Thx. –  Olie May 20 '13 at 23:35
    
This completely breaks the contract of allocWithZone. –  occulus Nov 4 '13 at 15:53
    
For more discussion on "to Singleton or not", see boredzo.org/blog/archives/2009-06-17/doing-it-wrong –  occulus Nov 4 '13 at 15:59

Alternatively, Objective-C provides the +(void)initialize method for NSObject and all its sub-classes. It is always called before any methods of the class.

I set a breakpoint in one once in iOS 6 and dispatch_once appeared in the stack frames.

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This is my pattern under ARC. Satisfies new pattern using GCD and also satisfies Apple's old instantiation prevention pattern.

@implementation AAA
+ (id)alloc
{
    return  [self allocWithZone:nil];
}
+ (id)allocWithZone:(NSZone *)zone
{
    [self doesNotRecognizeSelector:_cmd];
    abort();
}
+ (instancetype)theController
{
    static AAA* c1  =   nil;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^
    {
        c1  =   [[super allocWithZone:nil] init];

        // For confirm...       
        NSLog(@"%@", NSStringFromClass([c1 class]));    //  Prints AAA
        NSLog(@"%@", @([c1 class] == self));            //  Prints 1

        Class   real_superclass_obj =   class_getSuperclass(self);
        NSLog(@"%@", @(real_superclass_obj == self));   //  Prints 0
    });

    return  c1;
}
@end
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Won't this result in c1 being an instance of AAA's superclass? You need to call +alloc on self, not on super. –  Nick Forge Oct 17 '13 at 0:44
    
Fixed a bug that calling wrong method. –  Eonil Oct 17 '13 at 3:42
    
@NickForge super doesn't mean the super-class object. You cannot get super-class object It just means routing messages to the super-class version of method. super still points self class. If you want to get super-class object, you need to get runtime reflection functions. –  Eonil Oct 17 '13 at 3:55
    
@NickForge And -allocWithZone: method is just a simple chain to runtime's allocation function to offer overriding point. So ultimately, self pointer == current class object will be passed to allocator, and finally AAA instance will be allocated. –  Eonil Oct 17 '13 at 4:02
    
you're correct, I'd forgotten the subtleties of how super works in class methods. –  Nick Forge Oct 17 '13 at 5:19

This is a version for ARC and non-ARC

How To use:

MySingletonClass.h

@interface MySingletonClass : NSObject

+(MySingletonClass *)sharedInstance;

@end

MySingletonClass.m

#import "MySingletonClass.h"
#import "SynthesizeSingleton.h"
@implementation MySingletonClass
SYNTHESIZE_SINGLETON_FOR_CLASS(MySingletonClass)
@end
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protected by iWasRobbed Jun 22 '13 at 13:56

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