Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Take the following CSS+HTML:

<style>
    div.stuff {
        overflow: hidden;
        width: 100%;
        white-space: nowrap;
    }
    table { width: 100%; }
    td { border: 1px dotted black; }
</style>

<table>
    <tr><td>
        <div class='stuff'>Long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text</div>
    </td></tr>
</table>

This causes the table to grow to accommodate the entire long text. (Make your browser window smaller to see if you have a humongous screen resolution.)

I added width: 100% and overflow: hidden to indicate that the long text should simply be cut off, but it seems to ignore that. How do I constrain the table/the table cell/the div in such a way that the table’s width does not exceed the width of the document?

(Please don’t comment on the merits of using a table at all. I am indeed displaying tabular data, so the use of a table is semantically correct. Also please don’t question the user-friendliness of cutting off the text; there is actually an “expand” button that allows the user to view the full contents. Thanks!)

(Edit: I tried max-width too, to no avail.)

share|improve this question
up vote 44 down vote accepted

To achieve this, you have to wrap the long text into two divs. The outer one gets position: relative and contains only the inner one. The inner one gets position: absolute, overflow: hidden, and width: 100% (this constrains it to the size of the table cell).

The table-layout algorithm now considers those table cells empty (because absolutely-positioned elements are excluded from layout calculations). Therefore we have to tell it to grow that column regardless. Interestingly, setting width: 100% on the relevant <col> element works, in the sense that it doesn’t actually fill 100% of the width, but 100% minus the width of all the other columns (which are automatically-sized). It also needs a vertical-align: top as otherwise the (empty) outer div is aligned middle, so the absolutely-positioned element will be off by half a line.

Here is a full example with a three-column, two-row table showing this at work:

CSS:

div.outer {
    position: relative;
}
div.inner {
    overflow: hidden;
    white-space: nowrap;
    position: absolute;
    width: 100%;
}
table {
    width: 100%;
    border-collapse: collapse;
}
td {
    border: 1px dotted black;
    vertical-align: top;
}
col.fill-the-rest { width: 100%; }

HTML:

<table>
    <col><col><col class="fill-the-rest">
    <tr>
        <td>foo</td>
        <td>fooofooooofooooo</td>
        <td>
            <div class='outer'>
                <div class='inner'>
                    Long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text long text
                </div>
            </div>
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>barbarbarbarbar</td>
        <td>bar</td>
        <td>
            <div class='outer'>
                <div class='inner'>
                    Some more long text Some more long text Some more long text Some more long text Some more long text Some more long text Some more long text Some more long text Some more long text Some more long text Some more long text Some more long text Some more long text Some more long text Some more long text Some more long text Some more long text Some more long text
                </div>
            </div>
        </td>
    </tr>
</table>

In this example, the first two columns will have the minimum possible size (i.e. spaces will make them wrap a lot unless you also add white-space: nowrap to them).

jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/jLX4q/

share|improve this answer
    
Very nice solution and explanation. It's worth pointing out that div.inner { width: 100%; } is the relevant part - without that setting overflow will not do anything and the inner <div> will just bleed out to the right. Additionally, text-overflow: ellipsis; is now widely supported and should be set at the inner <div> for a nicer effect than just clipping the text. – Tomalak Jul 16 '13 at 15:45
    
I had to give my outer class a height to make this work. Also had to set the margin to auto, and top and bottom to 0 to make this work. I have some padding on my td's so I think that was causing the issue – Matt Lambert Nov 13 '13 at 21:18
    
Is there a way to make this allow for dynamic heights? For example, I want to have an indefinited number of stacked divs inside of the table cell, but I want each div to overflow based on width. Your example takes the width of the 'outer' div out of the table cell calculation, but it doesn't seem to treat height in the same manner; the height of cell is dictated by the max height of others in the row (just like the width is dictated by others in the column), but overflow-y does not behave in the same manner as overflow-x. – CalMlynarczyk Jul 17 '15 at 18:43
    
THANK YOU!! amazing solution, just working perfect! saved my day :) – Mike Aug 16 '15 at 8:47

I added width: 100% and overflow: hidden to indicate that the long text should simply be cut off, but it seems to ignore that.

It's not ignoring that, your div is expanding 100% the width of your table, which is set to expand 100% as it is, just give your td a max-width and it should cutoff as you expect.

share|improve this answer
    
Try this: jsfiddle.net/andresilich/LDY4w – Andres Ilich Sep 27 '11 at 13:00
    
Your code limits the TD to 200 pixels!... – Timwi Sep 27 '11 at 13:01
    
was that not the effect you're looking for? -- I added width: 100% and overflow: hidden to indicate that the long text should simply be cut off, but it seems to ignore that. -- – Andres Ilich Sep 27 '11 at 13:04
    
here is a demo i wrote up to answer another question here in SO, jsfiddle.net/caq8F/5, it has a div inside a td expanding 100% with overflow-x enabled. – Andres Ilich Sep 27 '11 at 13:06
    
“was that not the effect you're looking for?” — No, of course not; what if the page is 500px wide? 1000px? One would have thought that 100% should mean 100%... – Timwi Sep 27 '11 at 13:11

you have nowrap set so the td cannot properly constrain the content. Removing that value should achieve the desired result.

share|improve this answer
    
No, removing that value will make the text wrap. – Timwi Sep 27 '11 at 12:58
    
oh my bad I didn't realize you wanted the text cut off - sorry. Did you try setting your td to overflow:hidden ? – danpickett Sep 27 '11 at 13:01
    
Yes. – Timwi Sep 27 '11 at 13:04

As long as you have any width: 100% tags, it going to expand to contain the content.

One way to get the desired result (text that does not wrap) is to have an outer div w/ overflow hidden + a set width, then an inner div with a super wide width.

http://jsfiddle.net/xvaEw/

share|improve this answer
    
You can do that without using an outer div at all: just constrain the inner div to that size. – romkyns Sep 27 '11 at 13:13

Building off of @Timwi's solution...

table {
 width: 100%;
 border: 1px solid #ccc;
}

td {
 padding: 14px;
 line-height: 1.5;
 border: 1px solid #ccc;
}

.outer {
 position:relative;
 height: 22px;
}

.inner {
  position: absolute;
  overflow: hidden;
  width: 100%;
  white-space: nowrap;
  margin: auto;
  top: 0;
  bottom:0;
}

<table>
  <tr>
    <td>
      <div class="outer">
        <div class="inner">
          this_is_a_really_long_string_of_text
        </div>
      </div>
    </td>
    <td>
      222222222
    </td>
  </tr>
</table>

I'm using bootstrap 2.3.2 so that's where the height value is coming from. Here's a link to the fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/YFCV6/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.