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I was following this tutorial: http://blog.johanneshoppe.de/2010/10/walkthrough-ado-net-unit-testable-repository-generator/

And I had this issue: MVC3 & EF. Interface for TDD

However, now I have my interfaces setup (I am not using ninject due to project restrictions)

I am getting a null error here;

`Public partial class MyEntitiesRepository : MyEntitiesRepository
    {
        public IEnumerable<userdetails> getAlluserDetails()
        {
            return this.Context.userDetails.ToList();

        }`

Context is null. I am using the exact same structure as the tutorial.

The header in my MVC controller that calls this is: `

[HandleError]
    public class HomeController : Controller
    {

        private MyEntitiesRepository _repository;
...

...
public HomeController() : this(new externalEntities(), new MyEntitiesRepository ()){}
       public HomeController(externalEntities external, MyEntitiesRepository repository)
       {
           _repository = repository;
           _ContextExt = external;

       }

` EDIT:
context is from:

    [System.CodeDom.Compiler.GeneratedCode("ADO.NET Unit Testable Repository Generator", "0.5")]
    public partial class MyEntitiesRepository 
    {

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets or sets the specialised object context
        /// </summary>
        /// <value>object context</value>
        #if !DO_NOT_USE_UNITY
        [Dependency]
        #endif
        public IMyEntities Context { get; set; }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
It looks like the Context object in MyEntitiesRepository is never set. How does MyEntitiesRepository obtain its Context object? –  Jeroen Sep 27 '11 at 13:23
    
@Jeroen. Post edited to display context –  JustAnotherDeveloper Sep 27 '11 at 14:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Seeing the edit (the Dependency attribute) I guess the project restrictions you are referring to are that instead of Ninject you are to use Microsoft's Unity.

Now you can solve your problem using or not using Unity. To start with the latter: Adjust your HomeController and MyEntitiesRepository classes a little:

public HomeController() :
   this(new externalEntities(),
   new MyEntitiesRepository (new MyEntities()))
{
}

public HomeController(externalEntities external, MyEntitiesRepository repository)
{
   _repository = repository;
   _ContextExt = external;
}

public partial class MyEntitiesRepository 
{
    public MyEntitiesRepository(IMyEntities context)
    {
        this.Context = context;
    }

    public IMyEntities Context { get; private set; }
}

Here I made the assumption that you have a class MyEntities implementing the interface IMyEntities.

You could also use Unity. To get to know that framework a little better you could start at MSDN. I don't have any experience with Unity, but some things I noticied are that you need to create MyEntityRepository using a UnityContainer object:

IUnityContainer container = new UnityContainer();
...
MyEntityRepository repository = container.Resolve<MyEntityRepository>();

Before that works you need to register a mapping of MyEntities to IMyEntities:

container.RegisterType<IMyEntities, MyEntities>();

If you choose to try Unity I suggest you give it a try and ask a new question if you get stuck.

share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic stuff. Didn't have to use the UnityContainer part though –  JustAnotherDeveloper Sep 28 '11 at 15:18

I am guessing that in the example they pass the Context in the constructor. They can do this because they are using dependency injection and it will create that instance for you. Since you are not using Ninject, you will more than likely need to construct this Context yourself.

If you are unable to use Ninject or any other IoC container then you need to do a better job convincing your bosses to let you. If they still don't let you then you can do poor man's dependency injection I suppose:

public class MyEntitiesRepository
{
    private MyDbContext context;

    public MyEntitiesRepository() : this(new MyDbContext())
    { }

    public MyEntitiesRepository(MyDbContext context)
    {
        this.context = context;
    }
}

It's better than nothing I suppose?

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed, you have to have some sort of dependency injection. There are a few choices out there but ninject is the best imo. –  Chance Sep 27 '11 at 13:28
    
The context is in a partial class for the repository. I have edited the code to display this –  JustAnotherDeveloper Sep 27 '11 at 14:21
    
Ok so your Context is a property that is never getting set. It needs something to set it. It looks like it was using Property injection instead of constructor injection, but something somewhere needs to take care of creating that dependency for you if you are not using an IoC container. –  Dismissile Sep 27 '11 at 15:13

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