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There are a lot of different ways to read and write files (Text Files not Binary) in C#.

I just need something that is easy and uses the least amount of code, because I am going to be working with files a lot in my project. I only need something for Strings since all I need is to read and write Strings.

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9 Answers 9

up vote 51 down vote accepted

File.ReadAllText

File.WriteAllText

Could not be simpler...

MSDN examples:

// Create a file to write to. 
string createText = "Hello and Welcome" + Environment.NewLine;
File.WriteAllText(path, createText);

// Open the file to read from. 
string readText = File.ReadAllText(path);
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3  
Even simpler than I expected. :D –  ApprenticeHacker Sep 27 '11 at 13:48
    
Very simple indeed, but why then was it needed to post the question? OP was probably, like myself and the 17 upvoters, looking in the "wrong" direction along the lines of string.Write(filename). Why is Microsofts solution simpler / better than mine? –  Roland Aug 21 '13 at 16:40
    
@Roland, In .net, file handling is provided by the framework, not the languages (there are no C# keywords to declare and manipulate files for instance). Strings are a more common concept, so common that it is part of C#. Therefore it is natural that files know about strings but not the opposite. –  vc 74 Sep 14 '14 at 9:41
    
Xml is also a common concept with datatypes in C# and here we find e.g. XmlDocument.Save(filename). But of course the difference is that usually one Xml object corresponds with one file, while several strings form one file. –  Roland Sep 15 '14 at 13:23
1  
@Roland if you want to support "foo".Write(fileName) you can easily create extension to do so like public static Write(this string value, string fileName) { File.WriteAllText(fileName, value);} and use it in your projects. –  Alexei Levenkov Feb 17 at 23:23

Writing a text file:

StreamWriter writetext = new StreamWriter("write.txt");
writetext.WriteLine("writing in text file");
writetext.Close();

Reading a text file:

StreamReader readtext = new StreamReader("readme.txt");
string readmetext = readtext.ReadLine();
readtext.Close();

Hope this helps!

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Make sure to using your streams as shown in other answer - stackoverflow.com/a/7571213/477420 –  Alexei Levenkov Feb 17 at 23:19

I would recommend the following MSDN How to articles:

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Simpler than simplest:

(An example for accepted answer)

String yourText = "Hello World!";
File.WriteAllText("yourfile.ext",yourText);//writing

yourText = File.ReadAllText("yourfile.ext");//reading
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using (var file = File.Create("pricequote.txt"))
{
    ...........                        
}

using (var file = File.OpenRead("pricequote.txt"))
{
    ..........
}

Simple, easy and also disposes/cleans up the object once you are done with it.

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You're looking for the File, StreamWriter, and StreamReader classes.

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FileStream fs = new FileStream(txtSourcePath.Text,FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read);
using(StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(fs))
{
   using (StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(Destination))
   {
            sw.writeline("Your text");
    }
}
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It's good when reading to use OpenFileDialog-control to browse to any file you want to read. Find the code bellow:

Don't forget to add the following using-statement to read files: using System.IO;

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (openFileDialog1.ShowDialog() == DialogResult.OK)
    {
         textBox1.Text = File.ReadAllText(openFileDialog1.FileName);  
    }
}

To write files you can use the method: File.WriteAllText

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@AlexeiLevenkov pointed me at another "easiest way" namely the extension method. It takes just a little coding, then provides the absolute easiest way to read/write, plus it offers the flexibility to create variations according to your personal needs. Here is a complete example:

This defines the extension method on the string type

using System.IO;//File, Directory, Path

namespace Lib
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Handy string methods
    /// </summary>
    public static class Strings
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Extension method to write the string Str to a file
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="Str"></param>
        /// <param name="Filename"></param>
        public static void WriteToFile(this string Str, string Filename)
        {
            File.WriteAllText(Filename, Str);
            return;
        }

        // of course you could add other useful string methods...
    }//end class
}//end ns

This is how to use the string extension method, note that it refers automagically to the class Strings:

using Lib;//(extension) method(s) for string
namespace ConsoleApp_Sandbox
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            "Hello World!".WriteToFile(@"c:\temp\helloworld.txt");
            return;
        }

    }//end class
}//end ns

I would never have found this myself, but it works great, so I wanted to share this. Have fun!

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