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I did a simple test, I know C++ is faster but the results of my test is unrealistic.

C++ code is:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <windows.h>

unsigned long long s(unsigned long long n)
{
    unsigned long long s = 0;

    for (unsigned long long i = 0; i < n; i++)
        s += i;

    return s;
}

int main()
{
    LARGE_INTEGER freq, start, end;
    QueryPerformanceFrequency(&freq);
    QueryPerformanceCounter(&start);

    printf("%llu\n", s(1000000000));

    QueryPerformanceCounter(&end);
    double d = (double) (end.QuadPart - start.QuadPart) / freq.QuadPart * 1000.0;

    printf("Delta: %f\n", d);

    return 0;
}

Java code is:

public class JavaApplication5 {

    public static long s(long n) {
        long s = 0;

        for (long i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            s += i;
        }

        return s;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        long start = System.nanoTime();

        System.out.println(s(1000000000));

        long end = System.nanoTime();

        System.out.println((end - start)/1000000);
    }
}

C++ compiler: gcc 4.4.0 and Java: jdk 1.6.0

Java: 2795 ms

C++ : 0.013517 ms

It says C++ is 206777 times faster than Java! No way! What is wrong in my test?

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1  
Your comparison is based on an unrealistic piece of code. Not only that, comparing languages is like comparing apples to oranges. You might compare implementations of the same language, but different implementations of different languages! It is hardly an evidence of something. –  AraK Sep 27 '11 at 14:08
    
Nothing is wrong with your benchmark. When performance of C++ and Java are compared, these two are compared on an average program, which does some input, some output, some user interface and some calculations. Actual calculations are MUCH-MUCH faster in C/C++. Moreover, if you used float or double values, the difference would be even more noticeable. –  Aleks G Sep 27 '11 at 14:09
    
@AraK surely it's evidence that C++ is faster than Java at incrementing longs. –  bdares Sep 27 '11 at 14:09
1  
@bdares Do you suggest that C++ is faster than Java x206776 times at incrementing an integer? –  AraK Sep 27 '11 at 14:12
5  
There are many things wrong with your benchmark, but one major point is that you're including some startup time in your Java benchmark: the first invocation of System.out.println() will probably cause tons of classes to be loaded that weren't needed before. I guess that this alone will be responsible for a pretty big chunk of the difference. –  Joachim Sauer Sep 27 '11 at 14:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Show the compiler options you used. And your REAL code (#include <stdio> isn't your real code).

Your C++ compiler is much smarter than your Java compiler (this is true on average and in your case, but not every C++ compiler is smarter than every Java compiler), and it precomputed the result. The only thing you're timing is the printf call.

On most of the tasks Java is used for, it performs about as well as C++.

VM languages (Java, C#) have additional costs related to JIT compilation, but also benefit from more efficient memory allocation and inlining across shared libraries. And C++ is much much faster at accessing OS syscalls. Beyond that, C++ memory layouts can be carefully tuned for cache behavior; you don't get that level of control in managed languages.

Which of these factors has more influence is completely application-specific. Anyone making a blanket statement that "C++ is faster in general than Java" or "Java is faster in general than C++" is an idiot. Averages don't matter. Performance on YOUR application matters.


And here is my proof, that gcc is precomputing the answer.

On this code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <windows.h>

unsigned long long s(unsigned long long n)
{
    unsigned long long s = 0;

    for (unsigned long long i = 0; i < n; i++)
        s += i;

    return s;
}

int main( int argc, char** argv )
{
    LARGE_INTEGER freq, start, end;
    QueryPerformanceFrequency(&freq);
    QueryPerformanceCounter(&start);

    printf("%llu\n", s(1000000000));

    QueryPerformanceCounter(&end);
    double d = (double) (end.QuadPart - start.QuadPart) / freq.QuadPart * 1000.0;

    printf("Delta: %f\n", d);

    QueryPerformanceCounter(&start);

    printf("%llu\n", s(atol(argv[1])));

    QueryPerformanceCounter(&end);
    d = (double) (end.QuadPart - start.QuadPart) / freq.QuadPart * 1000.0;

    printf("Delta: %f\n", d);
    return 0;
}

With gcc-4.3.4, using the command-line ./g++-4 -omasoud-gcc.exe -O3 masoud.cpp:

bash-3.2# ./masoud-gcc 1000000000
499999999500000000
Delta: 0.845755
499999999500000000
Delta: 1114.105866

By comparison, MSVC++ 16.00.40219.01 for x64 (2010 SP1), command-line cl /Ox masoud.cpp:

> masoud 1000000000
499999999500000000
Delta: 229.684364
499999999500000000
Delta: 354.275606

VC++ isn't precomputing the answer, but 64-bit code does execute the loop more than three times faster. This is the speed that Java ought to approach.


More fun facts: gcc precomputes the answer faster than the code it generates to calculate it out. Compile time for gcc:

real    0m0.886s
user    0m0.248s
sys     0m0.185s
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1  
It's not necessarily a case of the C++ compiler being smarter (but it might be). A lot depends on where the code appears---typical JVM compilers will not optimize code until the function which it contains has been called a number of times. And a good C++ compiler can easily deduce that you'll execute the loop exactly n times, and the results of summing an arithmetic progression can be calculated without a loop. This is the sort of benchmark which doesn't test anything. –  James Kanze Sep 27 '11 at 15:27

I guess that gcc compiled your s method into:

unsigned long long s(unsigned long long n)
{    
    return n*(n+1)/2;
}

...while the java JIT did not.

I'm no expert but gcc optimization process may contain more passes than what the JIT can do in a reasonable time. That's also why a gcc compilation may take ages while a java program launches itself immediatly (altough the JIT has to compile, link and optimize everything before the program can be run).

The java compiler (javac) does very few optimization, like constant folding, but that's pretty much all. Every major optimization (inlining, etc) is done by the JIT, so if it does not want the user to wait too long before launch, it must hurry. On the other hand, since gcc compiles and optimize everything statically, it can take as long as it needs.

EDIT:

It should be simple to know if there is a difference in optimizations: run your two programs with s(1000) and then with s(100000000000000). If I'm true, the c++ program may take the exact same time for both calls, while the java one while take longer to complete in the second case.

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2  
I suspect any C++ compiler can do that. You have to make sure that the semantics of the program are reserved when doing optimizations, and to my knowledge what you are asking for requires intelligence. –  AraK Sep 27 '11 at 14:16
    
Wow, replacing the loop in s with your function above returns execution time of 0ms in JDK 1.6.0. At least on my machine. –  home Sep 27 '11 at 14:25
    
Actually, System.nanotime() is implemented using the QueryPerformance API, so the results should be equivalents. However, the spec says that "No guarantees are made about how frequently values change",so that may be what has happened in your case. –  Aurélien Ribon Sep 27 '11 at 14:37
1  
No, gcc didn't convert the method. If it did, it would be incredibly fast for ANY n, even one not known until runtime. The optimization it did do, replacing s(1000000000) by 499999999500000000, relies on n being a compile-time constant at the call site. –  Ben Voigt Sep 27 '11 at 14:43
    
That's why I added my edit :) Thanks –  Aurélien Ribon Sep 27 '11 at 15:37

First of all, you probably don't want the respective print functions to be part of your benchmark unless you really care how fast those are.

There's not a straight answer as to whether Java or C++ is faster...it depends. Java can be faster when the compiler can do some optimizations that would not be available for C++. So it depends on what specifically you are doing and what the compiler options are.

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