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I have a class which implements Handler.Callback

So, in my code i have something like this :

@Override
public boolean handleMessage(Message msg) {
    super.handleMessage(msg);
    switch (msg.what)
    {
        case ThreadMessages.MSG_1:
        {
            break;
        }

        case ThreadMessages.MSG_2:
        {
            break;
        }

        case ThreadMessages.MSG_3:
        {
            break;
        }

        case ThreadMessages.MSG_4:
        {
            break;
        }

        case ThreadMessages.MSG_5:
        {
            break;
        }

    }
    return false;
}

How should i comment this method to reflect the messages that my class can handle ?

The purpose here , is to let a developer know what message he can send to the class without having to read the source code , just using the java doc.

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

My Advice:

In class ThreadMessages Rename MSG_1 and the other static fields to some meaningful names.

Above your handleMessage

Add the following comments:

/**
 * Can handle {@link ThreadMessages#MSG_1}, {@link ThreadMessages#MSG_2}, {@link ThreadMessages#MSG_3}, {@link ThreadMessages#MSG_4}, and {@link ThreadMessages#MSG_5}
 */

And in class ThreadMessages

Explain each static feild by adding above it

/**
 * this is used for
 */
share|improve this answer
    
The MSG_X name stands for the example , my static field are ofcourse well named. Anyway , @link seems to be a good solution. –  grunk Sep 27 '11 at 14:46

Oracle has a great document about how to comment your code so you can generate Java Docs later on.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, Sun wrote it back in 2004; but, he's asking for a specific way to markup his code, for his situation. –  Edwin Buck Sep 27 '11 at 14:57

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