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I have default properties defined for my links like this:

a{
    color: blue;
}
a:hover{
    color: red;
}

The problem is that I lose the all the hover properties when I do something like this:

#header a{
    color: gray;
}

So to keep the hover working as I defined it before in the defaults, I'd have to declare it again:

#header a:hover{
    color: red;
}

Is there any way to do this without loosing the original hover action defined?

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3 Answers

You're over-riding the styles with a cascade. Putting "#header a" gives that style more weight than the original style. You can over-ride it with a !important (although I wouldn't recommend it). Here's an article that explains this concept.

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Micharch, thanks for the answer. I'm aware of specificity and that I could use !important, but I just want to know if there's a way to override the normal state while keeping the hover state. –  Jorge Pedret Sep 27 '11 at 15:44
1  
You have several options such as assigning them a class or id and then targeting that way to increase their specificity. So for example, if it's a specific group, give them a class like "special_hover" and then target it. This would give that specific group greater weight and make it more likely that they'll be targeted correctly. There's no way to really over-ride the cascade. You have to target things and give them weight. Personally, I try to avoid getting into specificity as much as possible. But in this case I can't think of another way to really do it. –  Micharch54 Sep 27 '11 at 16:29
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Unfortunately, if you want it to work in all browsers, you'll have to override it.

a { color:blue; }
a:hover { color:red; }

#header a { color:grey; }
#header a:hover { color:red; }

Example.

Alternatively, you can make use of !important. Usually this is a sign that something weird is going on in your css, but this seems to be the only alternative to duplicating your css.

a { color:blue; }
a:hover { color:red !important; }

#header a:hover { color:red; }

Example.

You could also make use of a css compiler such as sass or less which would let you write it in a manor where you aren't duplicating effort - but that's beyond the scope of this question.

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Hey elsom, thanks for the answer. I tried Jamie's example and it wasn't working as expected. Is it working for you? –  Jorge Pedret Sep 27 '11 at 15:40
    
I just tried and unfortunately not - though his new one is a good alternative! –  elsom25 Sep 27 '11 at 15:43
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One way you can do this is to specify the default style as !important.

Using !important is usually a sure fire sign that your code can be improved however in this context, and without re-defining the styles, it seems like the best choice (best I know of right now).

a:hover{
    color:blue !important;
}

Working Example

Also note that if you do go down the route of using the specific selector that you can combine both selectors together to reduce code duplication.

a:hover, #header a:hover{ color: red;}
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