Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have to make a high speed web app and I need a JavaScript templating library/system/engine/technique that returns a DOM Fragment instead of a String containing HTML.

Of course it should have some similar language as Resig's Micro-Templating

I am expecting something like this after compilation:

function myTemplate(dataToRender){
    var fragment = document.createDocumentFragment();
    fragment = fragment.appendChild(document.createElement('h1'));
    fragment.appendChild(document.createTextNode(dataToRender.title));
    fragment = fragment.parentNode;
    fragment = fragment.appendChild(document.createElement('h2'));
    fragment.appendChild(document.createTextNode(dataToRender.subTitle));
    fragment = fragment.parentNode;
    return fragment;
}

Is there any option?

Edit: Template function should not concatenate HTML strings. It decreases speed. JQuery templates are working with strings internally. So Resig's Micro-Templating.

Edit2: I just did a benchmark on jsPerf. It is the first benchmark I did in JavaScript so some check it out(I am not sure if it's correct).

share|improve this question
    
Could you clarify exactly what you're looking for? Your question is unclear. –  Matt Ball Sep 27 '11 at 15:58
    
The jsPerf results are interesting - it indicates it's the deep-cloning that causes the slowdown in my dom_tmpl function. (Unfortunately, it's also the part that makes it convenient as opposed to generating a string of DOM calls). I do wonder about the disparity between the innerHTML vs. DOM differences I get and you get. –  millimoose Sep 27 '11 at 20:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I had a go at this in this jsFiddle. Replacing a chunk of content is fastest when using DOM methods, but setting innerHTML isn't cripplingly slower and probably acceptable if your templates aren't very complex and you won't lose too much time in the string manipulation. (This isn't very surprising, "dealing with broken HTML quickly" is kind of what browsers are supposed to do and innerHTML is an ancient and popular property that probably had lots of optimisation go into it.) Adding another join() step in the innerHTML method also didn't really slow it down.

Conversely, using jQuery.tmpl() /and/ the DOM fragment method was orders of magnitude slower in Chrome on Mac. Either I'm doing something wrong in the dom_tmpl function, or deep-cloning DOM nodes is inherently slow.

I commented out the append tests because they froze up the tab process when you run the whole suite - thousands through tens of thousands of nodes shoved into a document probably confuse Chrome somehow. Appending with innerHTML alone ended up glacially slow because the string ends up being really huge.

The conclusion would seem to be: unless done stupidly or on very large strings, concatenating strings in a templating library likely isn't going to be what makes it slow, while trying to be clever with cloning chunks of the DOM will. Also, jQuery.tmpl() handled 2000-ish ops/sec on my computer, and 500-ish on my iPhone 4, this is likely "fast enough" if you're targetting these platforms. It was also in the same ballpark as the DOM fragment function making the latter largely pointless.

If you mostly need to replace the content of existing nodes and your templates aren't very large, use Underscore.js's templating and innerHTML. Underscore.js seems to do ten passes through the whole string, so if your templates /are/ large this could be an issue.

If you need to append to existing nodes, you can avoid serialising and reparsing the existing content by creating a wrapper element, seting its innerHTML, then append the wrapper element to the target node.

If you really want speed or your templates are crazy large, you'll probably have to do something like having a server-side script precompile your templates into Javascript that creates the respective nodes.

(Disclaimer: I don't claim to be any good at constructing test cases and benchmarks and only tested this in WebKit, you should tailor this to your use case and get a more relevant set of numbers.)

Update: I updated my jsFiddle benchmark to not use any jQuery features, in case its presence (user data on nodes etc.) was the cause of DOM node cloning being slow. Didn't help much.

share|improve this answer
    
I re-factored the benchmark. Check it out here. Now it isn't freezing the browser. –  Aalex Gabi Sep 27 '11 at 20:43
    
As you said I want to pre-compile templates on server side. So I need to save those compiled templates. The problem with jQuery is that it's compiling in jQuery dependent templates. –  Aalex Gabi Sep 27 '11 at 20:52
    
The jQuery plugin is really slow anyway. As I said (somewhere in that wall of tl;dr), if you are willing to roll a solution that generates straightforward DOM-manipulating code, that will give you by far the best performance. It's just a lot of extra work compared to just joining up strings, which is plenty fast. –  millimoose Sep 27 '11 at 21:00
    
I updated the jsPerf benchmark - I changed the join() based function so it reuses the same array on every call and avoids any data copies besides the final join(). Doesn't make a dent on this example, but if the template was long / complex, it could help. –  millimoose Sep 27 '11 at 21:03
    
Nice trick. Updates on benchmark. I think difference is huge. Is my benchmark correct? –  Aalex Gabi Sep 27 '11 at 21:16

Check out jquery templates. http://api.jquery.com/category/plugins/templates/

It let's you create html fragments with keywords like "if", "each", etc and undeclared variables. Then you can call "tmpl" on a fragment from JavaScript with some values, and a DOM element is returned.

share|improve this answer
    
jQuery templates are using internally strings that are pushed into an array that's joined with "". link. –  Aalex Gabi Sep 27 '11 at 18:26
    
@Aalex: The question remains as to whether that's significantly or at all slower than traversing a DOM fragment. –  millimoose Sep 27 '11 at 18:28
    
@Aalex: And the answer would be: orders of magnitude slower - microbenchmark . Even if the template was less contrivedly trivial it'd likely outperform jQuery templating. –  millimoose Sep 27 '11 at 18:36
    
2x-3x times. Function executes slower but the result is inserted instantly because is a reference to a DocumentFragment link and I did a benchmark link –  Aalex Gabi Sep 27 '11 at 19:24
    
@Aalex: See my answer where I expanded my benchmark. It seems to imply jQuery.tmpl()'s slowness comes from somewhere else than the fact it does string concatenation. (Probably because it's fairly feature-rich.) –  millimoose Sep 27 '11 at 20:32

I don't know if this is what you're searching for, but Underscore.js has a template utility.

Also, jquery can return the DOM of a matched element.

share|improve this answer

You could create individual objects that represent regions of your page or even go down as far as the individual element level, and do all this without resorting to DOM scripting which will be super slow. For instance:

function buttonFrag(data) {
    this.data = data;
}
buttonFrag.prototype = (function() {
    return {
        _html : function(h) {
            h.push("<h1>",data.title,"</h1>");
            h.push("<h2>",data.subTitle,"</h2>");
        },
        render : function(id) {
            var html = [];
            this._html(html);
            document.getElementById.innerHTML = html.join("");
        }
    }
})();

To implement this, you'd simply create a new object then invoke its render method to an id on your page:

var titleFragObj = new titleFrag({title: "My Title",subTitle: "My Subtitle");
titleFragObj.render("someId");

Of course you could get a bit more creative about the render method and use something like jQuery to write to a selector, then use the .html or .append methods like this:

render : function(selectorString, bAppend) {
    var html = [];
    this._html(html);
    var htmlString = html.join("");
    var destContainer = $(selectorString);
    if (bAppend) {
        destContainer.append(htmlString);
    } else {
        destContainer.html(htmlString);
    }
}

In that case you'd just provide a selector string and whether or not you want to append to the end of the container, or completely replace its contents:

        titleFragObj.render("#someId",true);

You could even go so far as to create a base object from which all your fragments descend from, then all you'd do is override the _html method:

function baseFragement(data) {
        this.data = data;
    }
baseFragment.prototype = (function() {
    return {
        _html : function() {
            //stub
        },
        render : function(selectorString, bAppend) {
            var html = [];
            this._html(html);
            var htmlString = html.join("");
            var destContainer = $(selectorString);
            if (bAppend) {
                destContainer.append(htmlString);
            } else {
                destContainer.html(htmlString);
            }
        }
    };
})();

Then all descendants would look something like this:

function titleFrag(data) {
    baseFragment.call(this,data);
}
titleFrag.prototype = new baseFragment();
titleFrag.prototype._html = function() {
    h.push("<h1>",data.title,"</h1>");
    h.push("<h2>",data.subTitle,"</h2>");
}

You could create an entire library of little fragment generators that descend from that common base class.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.