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I have a vector of items items, and a vector of indices that should be deleted from items:

std::vector<T> items;
std::vector<size_t> indicesToDelete;

items.push_back(a);
items.push_back(b);
items.push_back(c);
items.push_back(d);
items.push_back(e);

indicesToDelete.push_back(3);
indicesToDelete.push_back(0);
indicesToDelete.push_back(1);

// given these 2 data structures, I want to remove items so it contains
// only c and e (deleting indices 3, 0, and 1)
// ???

What's the best way to perform the deletion, knowing that with each deletion, it affects all other indices in indicesToDelete?

A couple ideas would be to:

  1. Copy items to a new vector one item at a time, skipping if the index is in indicesToDelete
  2. Iterate items and for each deletion, decrement all items in indicesToDelete which have a greater index.
  3. Sort indicesToDelete first, then iterate indicesToDelete, and for each deletion increment an indexCorrection which gets subtracted from subsequent indices.

All seem like I'm over-thinking such a seemingly trivial task. Any better ideas?


Edit Here is the solution, basically a variation of #1 but using iterators to define blocks to copy to the result.

template<typename T>
inline std::vector<T> erase_indices(const std::vector<T>& data, std::vector<size_t>& indicesToDelete/* can't assume copy elision, don't pass-by-value */)
{
    if(indicesToDelete.empty())
        return data;

    std::vector<T> ret;
    ret.reserve(data.size() - indicesToDelete.size());

    std::sort(indicesToDelete.begin(), indicesToDelete.end());

    // new we can assume there is at least 1 element to delete. copy blocks at a time.
    std::vector<T>::const_iterator itBlockBegin = data.begin();
    for(std::vector<size_t>::const_iterator it = indicesToDelete.begin(); it != indicesToDelete.end(); ++ it)
    {
        std::vector<T>::const_iterator itBlockEnd = data.begin() + *it;
        if(itBlockBegin != itBlockEnd)
        {
            std::copy(itBlockBegin, itBlockEnd, std::back_inserter(ret));
        }
        itBlockBegin = itBlockEnd + 1;
    }

    // copy last block.
    if(itBlockBegin != data.end())
    {
        std::copy(itBlockBegin, data.end(), std::back_inserter(ret));
    }

    return ret;
}
share|improve this question
    
#3 should be "Sort indeciesToDelete first, and delete them in reverse order. No need for correction then. Although, it's still the slow answer. – Mooing Duck Sep 27 '11 at 15:55
    
Is items only going to have a small number of elements. Or can it be huge? What are the costs of copying a T? What is the cost of destroying a T? Is T movable (as in C++11 movable)? – Loki Astari Sep 27 '11 at 15:56
    
T is a small struct holding a couple std::strings and some integers. Usually we're deleting small numbers of elements. I will use the reverse-sort solution posted below. Thank you all. – tenfour Sep 27 '11 at 16:00
1  
Gotta love the times you'd choose a list over a vector – flumpb Sep 27 '11 at 16:34
    
Do you care about preserving the order of the elements in the vector? – Nemo Sep 27 '11 at 17:07
up vote 11 down vote accepted

I would go for 1/3, that is: order the indices vector, create two iterators into the data vector, one for reading and one for writting. Initialize the writing iterator to the first element to be removed, and the reading iterator to one beyond that one. Then in each step of the loop increment the iterators to the next value (writing) and next value not to be skipped (reading) and copy/move the elements. At the end of the loop call erase to discard the elements beyond the last written to position.

BTW, this is the approach implemented in the remove/remove_if algorithms of the STL with the difference that you maintain the condition in a separate ordered vector.

share|improve this answer
    
I have implemented your solution and added the code to the question. Cheers sir. – tenfour Sep 27 '11 at 19:44
    
A much more simple algorithm is to order the indicesToDelete, and remove the elements from the vector in reverse order. You dont need to update any indices because all consequent indices will be lower. Note that the standard erase function is not very efficient. If the order doesn't have to be preserved, swap an element with the last and do a resize instead. – Angelorf Oct 9 '14 at 7:18
    
@Angelorf: The approach in the answer is more efficient than yours, the cost of sorting the indices is there in both approaches, each valid element is copied at most once in my approach, while in the worst case it will be a linear number of times in yours. The call to erase is not inefficient. By the time the call is done it behaves as a resize to a smaller size (erase(it,end())), with potentially a small constant factor difference in the checks, if you feel strongly about the erase you can substitute it for a resize(it-begin()) for the same effect. [...] – David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 9 '14 at 8:40
    
[...] The difference between the erase(it,end()) and resize will still be much smaller than the additional cost you would be incurring by moving elements from the end multiple times. The cost would be similar than the approach with the difference that this is stable. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 9 '14 at 8:42
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas with an input vector of size N and M elements to be removed, the total time complexity of copying is O(M). The fact that a single element may be copied/moved M times can mislead you into thinking that the worst case total number of copy-moves would be O(M²), which is not the case. However, in the situation where we only keep the last element, my algorithm performs M-1 copies, while yours performs just a single one -- an argument pro your algorithm. My algorithm can be performed with less code, however. It is simple to understand and to implement. – Angelorf Oct 9 '14 at 9:22

std::sort() the indicesToDelete in descending order and then delete from the items in a normal for loop. No need to adjust indices then.

share|improve this answer
    
Idea #1 is far faster though. – Mooing Duck Sep 27 '11 at 16:02
    
Idea #1, combined with the ordering of the second vector makes for a linear algorithm O( M + N ), on the sizes of the two vectors, which is actually O(N) on the size of the vector to modify. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 27 '11 at 16:10
3  
Instead of deleting immediately, if the order of the vector after the operation isn't important, swap the element at the index with the end of the vector, then at the end, erase the final n elements, where n is the number of elements in the indicesToDelete vector. – James Kanze Sep 27 '11 at 16:25

It might even be option 4:

If you are deleting a few items from a large number, and know that there will never be a high density of deleted items:

Replace each of the items at indices which should be deleted with 'tombstone' values, indicating that there is nothing valid at those indices, and make sure that whenever you access an item, you check for a tombstone.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for thinking out of the box! The tombstones values are very good in MultiThreaded situations, for example, where you prefer to keep changes as local as possible. Note, though, that not all requirements may accomodate tombstones, notably, it is now costly to map a "real" index to an index in the vector with phantom elements. – Matthieu M. Sep 27 '11 at 18:18

It depends on the numbers you are deleting.

If you are deleting many items, it may make sense to copy the items that are not deleted to a new vector and then replace the old vector with the new vector (after sorting the indicesToDelete). That way, you will avoid compressing the vector after each delete, which is an O(n) operation, possibly making the entire process O(n^2).

If you are deleting a few items, perhaps do the deletion in reverse index order (assuming the indices are sorted), then you do not need to adjust them as items get deleted.

share|improve this answer

Since the discussion has somewhat transformed into a performance related question, I've written up the following code. It uses remove_if and vector::erase, which should move the elements a minimal number of times. There's a bit of overhead, but for large cases, this should be good.

However, if you don't care about the relative order of elements, then this will not be all that fast.

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <set>

using std::vector;
using std::string;
using std::remove_if;
using std::cout;
using std::endl;
using std::set;

struct predicate {
    public:
        predicate(const vector<string>::iterator & begin, const vector<size_t> & indices) {
            m_begin = begin;
            m_indices.insert(indices.begin(), indices.end());
        }

        bool operator()(string & value) {
            const int index = distance(&m_begin[0], &value);
            set<size_t>::iterator target = m_indices.find(index);
            return target != m_indices.end();
        }

    private:
        vector<string>::iterator m_begin;
        set<size_t> m_indices;
};

int main() {
    vector<string> items;
    items.push_back("zeroth");
    items.push_back("first");
    items.push_back("second");
    items.push_back("third");
    items.push_back("fourth");
    items.push_back("fifth");

    vector<size_t> indicesToDelete;
    indicesToDelete.push_back(3);
    indicesToDelete.push_back(0);
    indicesToDelete.push_back(1);

    vector<string>::iterator pos = remove_if(items.begin(), items.end(), predicate(items.begin(), indicesToDelete));
    items.erase(pos, items.end());

    for (int i=0; i< items.size(); ++i)
        cout << items[i] << endl;
}

The output for this would be:

second
fourth
fifth

There is a bit of a performance overhead that can still be reduced. In remove_if (atleast on gcc), the predicate is copied by value for each element in the vector. This means that we're possibly doing the copy constructor on the set m_indices each time. If the compiler is not able to get rid of this, then I would recommend passing the indices in as a set, and storing it as a const reference.

We could do that as follows:

struct predicate {
    public:
        predicate(const vector<string>::iterator & begin, const set<size_t> & indices) : m_begin(begin), m_indices(indices) {
        }

        bool operator()(string & value) {
            const int index = distance(&m_begin[0], &value);
            set<size_t>::iterator target = m_indices.find(index);
            return target != m_indices.end();
        }

    private:
        const vector<string>::iterator & m_begin;
        const set<size_t> & m_indices;
};

int main() {
    vector<string> items;
    items.push_back("zeroth");
    items.push_back("first");
    items.push_back("second");
    items.push_back("third");
    items.push_back("fourth");
    items.push_back("fifth");

    set<size_t> indicesToDelete;
    indicesToDelete.insert(3);
    indicesToDelete.insert(0);
    indicesToDelete.insert(1);

    vector<string>::iterator pos = remove_if(items.begin(), items.end(), predicate(items.begin(), indicesToDelete));
    items.erase(pos, items.end());

    for (int i=0; i< items.size(); ++i)
        cout << items[i] << endl;
}
share|improve this answer

Basically the key to the problem is remembering that if you delete the object at index i, and don't use a tombstone placeholder, then the vector must make a copy of all of the objects after i. This applies to every possibility you suggested except for #1. Copying to a new list makes one copy no matter how many you delete, making it by far the fastest answer.
And as David Rodríguez said, sorting the list of indexes to be deleted allows for some minor optimizations, but it may only worth it if you're deleting more than 10-20 (please profile first).

share|improve this answer

Here is my solution for this problem which keeps the order of the original "items":

  1. create a "vector mask" and initialize (fill) it with "false" values.
  2. change the values of mask to "true" for all the indices you want to remove.
  3. loop over all members of "mask" and erase from both vectors "items" and "mask" the elements with "true" values.

Here is the code sample:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    vector<unsigned int> items(12);
    vector<unsigned int> indicesToDelete(3);
    indicesToDelete[0] = 3;
    indicesToDelete[1] = 0;
    indicesToDelete[2] = 1;
    for(int i=0; i<12; i++) items[i] = i;

    for(int i=0; i<items.size(); i++)
      cout << "items[" << i << "] = " << items[i] << endl;

    // removing indeces
    vector<bool> mask(items.size());
    vector<bool>::iterator mask_it;
    vector<unsigned int>::iterator items_it;
    for(size_t i = 0; i < mask.size(); i++)
      mask[i] = false;
    for(size_t i = 0; i < indicesToDelete.size(); i++)
      mask[indicesToDelete[i]] = true;        

    mask_it = mask.begin();
    items_it = items.begin();
    while(mask_it != mask.end()){
      if(*mask_it){
        items_it = items.erase(items_it);
        mask_it = mask.erase(mask_it);
      }
      else{
        mask_it++;
        items_it++;
      }
    }

    for(int i=0; i<items.size(); i++)
      cout << "items[" << i << "] = " << items[i] << endl;

    return 0;
}

This is not a fast implementation for using with large data sets. The method "erase()" takes time to rearrange the vector after eliminating the element.

share|improve this answer

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